Need to know about "diodes"

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by Rod Reynolds, Sep 6, 2015.

  1. Rod Reynolds

    Thread Starter New Member

    Sep 6, 2015
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    I'm hooking up a small battery back-up 3000 watt solar for back-up on my home if the grid goes down. I'm hard wiring it to a dry receptacle with two Coleman Air - B170 Diode Arrays (Blocking Diodes) @ 600 volts, 180 amps.
    My question is when I checked to make sure the grid 120 volts was blocked I got the right readings off the + & - terminals on both Arrays. But will pick-up a 120 volt A/C for a very short time it then turns into 57 volts DC at the receptacle plug on the invertor side of the Array. Does it take the Diodes time to react, or are these so type of phantom readings? There was enough electric to run a small radio for about 1 minute and would run a light blub without ever going off.

    The reason I'm hooking up to a dryer outlet is because I want to back feed my 200 amp sub panel (with the main breaker off). By doing so I should be able to run my home on its electric circuit without having to run electric cords all over the place.

    I'd appreciate any help I can get.

    Thank Apollo54
     
  2. imaginewhen

    New Member

    Jun 10, 2014
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  3. imaginewhen

    New Member

    Jun 10, 2014
    7
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    In my opinion I, think it would be wise to install a relay, so that your AC coming from the electric company, is completely disconnected from your house wiring, and the Solar Back up system. The same relay can be used to connect the solar output, to your distribution panel house wiring, if you use a double throw switching relay. With this method you are sure no AC will flow into your solar system.
    Please be aware of the danger that can occur if your AC power source from the electric company and your solar system should both connect at the same time, smoke and ashes will be the result. If the relay is driven by the AC from your power company, when the power goes off, the relay would open the connection from your power company to the house wiring panel, and now would switch and connect the Solar output to your house wiring .You would have complete isolation using a relay as well as a short delay in switching from one system to the other, this would allow your appliances to all switch off, before you went on to your Solar output. When the AC power from the power company switched on again the relay would connect the power to the house wiring and disconnect the Solar input. Hope this gives you some help, you cannot afford mistakes when you are working with a power source from the electric company as high amperage can cause fire hazards.The relay should be mounted in your main electric panel where the circuit breaker are installed. Cheers Jim
     
    Last edited: Sep 7, 2015
  4. be80be

    Senior Member

    Jul 5, 2008
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    What your doing is a bad idea all the way around they make a lockout the shuts the main off from the breaker box then you turn on a back feed breaker from your power supply.

    Like this http://www.homedepot.com/p/GE-PowerMark-Gold-Load-Center-Generator-Interlock-Kit-THQLLX1/100674082
    You have to turn off the main then it locks it out so you can turn on the off line power supply. It's the safe way to go cause your off line power can't be used without the main off to the street.
    Say the power is off and it's the transformer that feeds your house it trips the fuse at the pole by the transformer the power company outside they think the feed to your house is dead it's not cause you didn't lockout your main off you can get into a world of trouble.
     
    Last edited: Sep 7, 2015
  5. be80be

    Senior Member

    Jul 5, 2008
    431
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    Relay Is a good idea but it has to be made for locking out the main and they cost a arm and a leg.
    I would use the lockout kit made for the breaker panel you have it's safe and code legal.
     
  6. dl324

    Distinguished Member

    Mar 30, 2015
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    This is a bad idea. In addition to being a code violation in every locale, you could kill someone if someone forgot to open the main disconnect and back energized the power lines.

    This needs to be done by a licensed electrician with permits and they'll charge you $1K just to touch your power panel.

    Having a licensed electrician and permits doesn't mean it will be done properly. The electricians who wired my generator transfer switch did it incorrectly and the inspector missed it. I found the problem the first time I used it and had to rewire before I could use my generator...
     
  7. be80be

    Senior Member

    Jul 5, 2008
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    dL324 There a lot of electricians that can just pull wire A kit Like I showed is the best as far as safety goes.
    And is code legal. But people need to see what there having done is right mistake cost money.
    In my 34 years as electrician I've seen a lot of them that didn't know how to use a meter to test a wire
    and couldn't understand a 3 way switch.
    And let's not even get into bonding 2 or 3 generators to get more amps.
     
    Last edited: Sep 7, 2015
  8. dl324

    Distinguished Member

    Mar 30, 2015
    3,235
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    There are many ways to do this correctly and the kit you suggested is one of them. The best way to do it depends on many factors (cost, convenience, safety, ...).

    My point is that the way the OP wants to connect his backup is illegal in the US and could get someone killed. Homeowners in all locales in the US can do whatever they want because if they don't pull permits, no one will be the wiser; until something causes their work to be scrutinized.
     
  9. be80be

    Senior Member

    Jul 5, 2008
    431
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    LOl I said that
    And that what dl324 said works too. Plus you got to watch people they make mistakes.
    But a panel lock out there is no safer way it's lockout you have nothing that break on you.
     
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