Need stripboard soldering and layout tips.

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by TIP31, Feb 1, 2014.

  1. TIP31

    Thread Starter New Member

    Aug 17, 2013
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    I need some tips on laying out circuits on strip boards, and help successfully soldering on them.
     
  2. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
    16,346
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    Do your layout work with a pencil. I use 10 square per inch graph paper because the strip boards use .1 inch spacing. Then put the parts in, bend the leads a little so they won't fall out. Turn the board upside down and solder the parts to the pads. Then grab some rather fine wire and tack solder it to each pad as you go from one component to the next. A stainless steel dental pick can be used to make 90 degree turns nice and square.
     
  3. TIP31

    Thread Starter New Member

    Aug 17, 2013
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    Most of my troubles are with the solder melting to the other rails.
     
  4. Dr.killjoy

    Well-Known Member

    Apr 28, 2013
    1,190
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    Please explain your problems so we can help instead of posting a general subject and beating around the bush and making us guess...
    Also its about control and watch Collin protoype build on makes youtube channel..


    Thanks
    Jason SR
     
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  5. ErnieM

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 24, 2011
    7,395
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    Make sure you clean the board before you put anything on it, meaning find some steel wool and scrub the copper bright again.

    If you can't keep the solder on one pad then get a smaller tip for your iron and thinner solder.
     
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  6. wayneh

    Expert

    Sep 9, 2010
    12,155
    3,061
    I use a soldering iron with a fine tip. It's cheap, but it works fine and made this job a LOT easier than anything I had before. Get the fine tip; I think I bought the pack of multiple replacement tips.

    Be sure you're also using the right solder.
     
  7. TIP31

    Thread Starter New Member

    Aug 17, 2013
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    What is the "right" solder?
     
  8. wayneh

    Expert

    Sep 9, 2010
    12,155
    3,061
    Oh boy, get ready for a deluge of advice. ;)

    I think rosin core 60/40 lead/tin is commonly used.
     
    Last edited: Feb 1, 2014
  9. THE_RB

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 11, 2008
    5,435
    1,305
    A clean board will help a lot. Also you need a fine tip soldering iron, and it really helps to have a plunger type desolderer (solder sucker) to remove the excess solder from the stripboard.

    For general tips;
    use a long rail for power and ground
    use a 1/8" drill bit in a handle or electric screwdriver to cut tracks
    run tracks horizontally (obviously, when you have ICs!)
    run top wires vertically
    but some 0.1" snappable rows of pins, for taking wires off-board
    :)
     
  10. pilko

    Senior Member

    Dec 8, 2008
    213
    20
    This may help you. Print it and draw components and connecting wires with pencil.
     
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  11. pilko

    Senior Member

    Dec 8, 2008
    213
    20
    You can also use a stripboard / breadboard layout program like "Pebble", as I have used here.
     
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  12. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
    10,570
    2,381
    There is also free VeeCAD.
    A cheap source of strip board is http://www.futurlec.com/Protoboards.shtml
    3rd and 45th down.
    Use a box cutter blade to run down the space between strips after completion, you can detect/remove pin hair shorts between strips etc.
    Max.
     
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  13. varicap

    New Member

    Jan 30, 2014
    3
    0
    Pilko, thanks for mentioning the file on Pebble software - I downloaded the fule but it doesn't seem to want to unzip - any clues? I am computer literate, but don't normally have to deal with the zip/unzip procedure - thanks up ahead

    Varicap
     
  14. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
    16,346
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    Right click, extract all, unless you have a MAC or Linux. I hear thy are easier than Windows. :D
     
  15. GopherT

    AAC Fanatic!

    Nov 23, 2012
    6,073
    3,846
    Clean your solder tip, clean your solder tip, clean your solder tip.

    Don't over-heat your workpiece. Touch the solder tip to the copper ring and a bit of lateral force onto the component lead - count to 2 or 3 then touch some thin solder where the tip touches the copper ring. Don't add too much. You only need enough to make a nice cone of solder that covers the ring and works up the lead about 0.5 mm (half the height of a coin).

    You can redo to add more very easily - repeat as I described above. Don't mash your solder in too early. It is difficult to remove if you have too much - don't be afraid to stop, look and add more. If you do add more, heat until you see the matte gray solder melt and turn glossy befor adding solder.
     
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