Need some help :)

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by Tom,, Oct 29, 2010.

  1. Tom,

    Thread Starter New Member

    Apr 19, 2010
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    0
    Hello,

    Basically I'm trying to make a remote controlled unit which supplies power to an circuit when the remote is pressed.

    This is the circuit I've bought with the 12 button remote.

    [​IMG]

    There is 12 channels on the circuit, and 3 ports per channel. One port is positive, one port is negative. I'm going to connect the positive to the red on a speaker terminal, and negative on the black. What is the other port for?

    Also, is their any way I can have an LED which will light up when the circuit? So once the circuit is connected and it's got a good connection I would like an LED to light up. I don't know how this would work though?

    Thanks for any help.
    Tom
     
  2. tom66

    Senior Member

    May 9, 2009
    2,613
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    I would take a guess that there is an input, and a normally open output (which is connected to the input when the control signal is present) and a normally closed output (which is connected to the input when the control signal is absent.) But what order would be a mystery to me; you'd have to check the manual.
     
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  3. hgmjr

    Moderator

    Jan 28, 2005
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    I tried to find a datasheet on the board but I could not get a hit using google.

    What I think you will find is that the ABC outputs are the common, the normally open and the normally closed contacts. Not necessarily in that order. A DVM can assist you in determining which connection is which.

    hgmjr
     
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  4. thatoneguy

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 19, 2009
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    718
    What the others said. Those are all relays, for each ABC, one, say B is common to both. When deactivated, A and B would be connected, when activated, B and C would be connected.

    Letters probably don't match this post, but once you find out which one is "common" to both the "on" and "off" states with an ohmmeter on one relay, the lettering should be consistent throughout the rest of the outputs (same letter on all). This also may be in fine print in the documentation, using the terms COM (for common), NO (for normally open), and NC (for normally closed). NC to COM is what you will find continuity on when the power is off.
     
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  5. Tom,

    Thread Starter New Member

    Apr 19, 2010
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    Thanks, I've kind of got it now. Any idea as to how I would get an LED to light up once the circuit is made correctly, without supplying voltage to the speaker terminal?
     
  6. tom66

    Senior Member

    May 9, 2009
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    I don't see any way to do it without hacking the board, unless you duplicate one of the relay outputs just for driving the LED, seems a bit wasteful though. One way with hacking would be to make the LED run off the coil of the relay with a suitable resistor - the driver chip should be fine with it; some soldering required.
     
  7. thatoneguy

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 19, 2009
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    You also might want to take the sticker off the onboard piezo buzzer. They cover that for the soldering process, and is normally removed at the factory.
     
  8. hgmjr

    Moderator

    Jan 28, 2005
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    Here is a link to the part on the manufacturers website. Since this is a through hole part you can use a DVM to sort out the connections of the relay to the output screw terminals.

    hgmjr
     
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