need recommendation for good soldering iron

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by arvaser, Jan 22, 2014.

  1. arvaser

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jan 22, 2014
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    hello my friend, i decided to buy a new soldering iron.
    until now i used YiHUA rework station (the heat gun is good but the soldering iron very not comftorable).
    mostly i rework on iphone and galaxy motherboards, which iron tip it the most recommended for my soldering iron? maybe the problem that i can't work with my soldering iron is the tip? or maybe just the soldering iron is crapy?
    anyway, i would like you to recommend me a good soldering iron for about 150$ (i think it's enough)

    the problem with my soldering iron is that when i touch the "ground" soldering (for example when i try to add some solder i find it very hard since it takes a few seconds until the ground pad is heating up, also when i try to use soldering wick on that same pad i just have to hold the sodlering iron about 15-20 seconds until it starts to wick the solder.

    sorry for my english, thank you.
     
  2. bountyhunter

    Well-Known Member

    Sep 7, 2009
    2,498
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    I like the Weller TCP series because there are so many tips to choose from. If you want more heat, use a thicker tip.
     
  3. arvaser

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jan 22, 2014
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    Hi friend, thank you for your replay, is it good for iPhone and galaxy rework?
     
  4. bountyhunter

    Well-Known Member

    Sep 7, 2009
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    Never tried that. My eyes can't see parts that small.
     
  5. arvaser

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jan 22, 2014
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    i see, but i'm sure that some one here have tried that, waiting for more comments, thank you anyway my friend.
     
  6. THE_RB

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 11, 2008
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    That problem is a symptom of not enough heater element power.

    That's the reason I use a 60W electronic temperature controlled iron, not a 40W iron.
     
  7. Metalmann

    Active Member

    Dec 8, 2012
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    "the problem with my soldering iron, is that when I touch the "ground" soldering (for example when I try to add some solder I find it very hard since it takes a few seconds until the ground pad is heating up), also when I try to use soldering wick on that same pad; I just have to hold the soldering iron about 15-20 seconds until it starts to wick the solder."



    Like RB says, either not enough heat, or get a larger tip, or both.
     
  8. arvaser

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jan 22, 2014
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    Hi, I have this "YiHUA 898D" rework station, the air gun is good,
    Can you please tell me if I can put in this soldering iron stronger heating element?
    Thanks :)
    Edit: I got 2 spare heating elements and I see that it's 50w, isn't it suppose to be enough?
     
    Last edited: Jan 24, 2014
  9. THE_RB

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 11, 2008
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    It might be 50 "Chinese watts". They're little. ;)

    You have to watch out for "Chinese honesty", an oxymoron, because they will just use any words and numbers on the advertising (or label) that make the product sell.

    Can you measure the volts and amps to the heating element?
     
  10. KL7AJ

    AAC Fanatic!

    Nov 4, 2008
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    I've just become a great fan of the Hakko series of soldering stations. A lot cheaper than the Wellers, and as far as I can tell, just as reliable.

    Eric
     
  11. arvaser

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jan 22, 2014
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    sure, but how dod i do it ?

    Hi Eric, i found on eBay for around 125$ a used weller wes51
    also, i have found on amazon for around 100$ the hakko fx-888d and the weller wes51 just not sure if there is shipping to Israel.
     
  12. THE_RB

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 11, 2008
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    To measure the volts and amps of the heater you can put an ammeter in series with the heater, then turn the soldering iron on from cold and for the first 20 seconds or so the heater will be fully on, so it will show the amps.

    Then let the iron cool down and set your meter to volts, then repeat, this time measuring the volts across the heater element.

    Then multiplying the two readings should give you a pretty good idea of the heater wattage;
    P = E*I
    :)
     
  13. Dave_UYZ

    New Member

    Jan 16, 2014
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    Or :
    Measure the resistance of the heater.
    Then measure the current as before

    W = I^2 *R

    OR:
    Measure the resistance of the heater.
    Measure Voltage on the heater

    W = V^2 /R

    [Hope my memory hasn't slipped]
     
  14. THE_RB

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 11, 2008
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    Sorry Dave_UYZ but I will argue that.

    Normally what you said is correct, and can be used in a lot of situations with a resistor.

    But the soldering iron heater element will have many times different resistance when fully on and hot, compared to its (much lower) cold resistance.

    The only way you can accurately measure a heating element power with a multimeter is to measure volts and amps at the same time (requires two meters).

    My suggestion to measure volts and then amps, is a tiny bit less accurate due to the (small) resistance of the ammeter, but it still gets the wattage value pretty close. :)
     
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