Need help with wiring an electric motor

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by OGRE, May 31, 2013.

  1. OGRE

    Thread Starter Member

    May 31, 2013
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    Hello everyone. Im trying to wire a GE electric motor to an outlet. The motor is out of an old HVAC unit. I will be using it along with the blower housing it came with as an exhaust fan for my garage. Now....

    After installing a new recepticle which seems to be fine. I ran a temp extension cord from the motor and plugged it in. The motor started to smoke after a few seconds.(I immediatly unplugged once I saw smoke). Is my recepticle putting out to many volts or maybe not enough?

    Heres a break down of items used for the outlet/recepticle
    1. 10/3 wire
    2. 30 amp DP breaker
    3. 30 amp 125/250 outlet
    4. 30/50 amp dual power plug


    Earlier in the day I took this motor to a local shop that deals with electric motors. They informed me all I needed to do was to connect the black, and yellow wires for power. Stating also that the other wires are for speed control and are not needed for what im using it for. My question is could they have been wrong by chance??? Do I not need anymore of the leads to have this motor work properly? Here is an image of the motor and motor specs:

    GE
    V. 208-230
    HP. 3/4
    PH. 1
    HZ. 60
    RPM. 1075
    [​IMG]

    Thanks in advance.
     
  2. Dodgydave

    Distinguished Member

    Jun 22, 2012
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    744
    Looks like a 3 speed single phase motor, may be this video might give you an idea.
     
  3. OGRE

    Thread Starter Member

    May 31, 2013
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    0
    Very helpful video. It doesn't explain why the motor started to smoke. Do I have to many volts running to it or maybe not enough? Should I use another lead? Did I use the correct lead? Seems straight forward, but I always seem to hit a snag on all my projects lol.
     
  4. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
    16,278
    6,789
    It all seems moot right now. Once you let the smoke out, they never work right, and yes, the people that told you to use black and yellow might be wrong. That is why you use the model number to look it (the wiring) up.
    The right voltage is the voltage on the name plate. If I am reading it correctly, it seems to say, "208/230VAC". They will still work at 250 volts. There is usually a part number on the plate, too. GE numbers usually have a "K" in them. This one looks like it has too many wires for 3 speeds. Maybe it is reversable and that accounts for the extra wires.

    The capacitor usually connects to 2 brown wires or a brown and brown with white stripe. The brown with white is often connected to one of the main power lines (internally). You can double check this with an ohm meter.

    So...try to find the wiring diagram from the model number. If you connect it correctly and it smokes, it is broken. If you connect it wrong and it smokes, that is because you connected it wrong. It's just a matter of luck when you guess at the connections for a motor that has been removed from dead equipment.
     
  5. OGRE

    Thread Starter Member

    May 31, 2013
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    Hmmm. As I said the motor came on then started to smoke shortly after. Im aware also though that just because it came on. Doesn't mean its wired correctly.
    Im thinking it could be how the cord was wired. I used a 10g standard (not solid) wire black to black, and yellow to white. I just pinched the ground onto the motors ground. SHOULD THE MOTORS GROUND BE CONNECTED TO THE CORD AS SUCH? Heres an image of how it was when I tried it.
    [​IMG]
     
  6. OGRE

    Thread Starter Member

    May 31, 2013
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    Here is the model # of the motor

    5KCP49SG1010S
     
  7. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
    16,278
    6,789
    Yes, Green = earth ground = case ground. The internal wiring of the motor should have no continuity to the case. It's just a safety ground in case the windings short to the case of the motor. If you do get any current through the green wire, even a few milliamps, it is a sure sign the windings have shorted out.

    Here is what I would try, considering that I can not successfully google a wiring diagram: See if one of the brown capacitor wires has 0.0 ohms to one of the not-brown wires. If true, that is one side of the power line. Then find the highest resistance winding that is not a capacitor wire and connect the other side of the power to that. It should be "low" speed. Still, watch for smoke.

    ps, That is not a 30 amp motor. More like 3 or 4 amps under full load. Even less when running free like that. The start surge will destroy a 10 amp/fast blow fuse, but you should be able to run it on a lot smaller breaker, like 15 amps.
     
  8. gerty

    AAC Fanatic!

    Aug 30, 2007
    1,153
    304
    [QUOTEEarlier in the day I took this motor to a local shop that deals with electric motors. They informed me all I needed to do was to connect the black, and yellow wires for power. Stating also that the other wires are for speed control and are not needed for what im using it for. My question is could they have been wrong by chance??? Do I not need anymore of the leads to have this motor work properly? Here is an image of the motor and motor specs:

    GE
    V. 208-230
    HP. 3/4
    PH. 1
    HZ. 60
    RPM. 1075][/QUOTE]


    Usually multiple speed motors have all the available speeds listed, this one only shows 1075 rpm... I have no idea what all the other wires would be for.
     
  9. OGRE

    Thread Starter Member

    May 31, 2013
    41
    0
    #12 Even though its a 30 amp breaker is the motor drawing the whole 30? If im correct the motor needs atleast 208 volts to operate properly? I have to run minimum a 30 amp breaker for a 220-250V recepticle right? So are your saying I can plug this into a 110 recepticle?
     
    Last edited: Jun 1, 2013
  10. OGRE

    Thread Starter Member

    May 31, 2013
    41
    0

    Usually multiple speed motors have all the available speeds listed, this one only shows 1075 rpm... I have no idea what all the other wires would be for.[/QUOTE]

    This is what the guy gave me on paper to help me identify the wires:
    2 purple wires cap.
    Black-Hi
    Blue-Med
    Yellow-Common
    Brown-Med low
    Red-Low
     
  11. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
    16,278
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    NO. I did not say anything about intentionally connecting this motor to the wrong voltage. I said it will not be using the whole 30 amps.
     
  12. OGRE

    Thread Starter Member

    May 31, 2013
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    #12 just trying to clarify on that thanks. Im thinking the yellow wire may be a different speed, and NOT my common. So I essentially had two speeds wired up which I know can be bad. Since I have no white wire, and all my wires are solid colors.

    How can I identify which wire is common?
     
  13. OGRE

    Thread Starter Member

    May 31, 2013
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  14. PackratKing

    Well-Known Member

    Jul 13, 2008
    850
    215
    Is this motor part of a squirrel-cage blower assembly ??

    If so... it is IMPERATIVE to have the baffle installed on the housing... that controls running amperage.

    Demonstrate this to yourself, by placing the assembled blower on your bench... business-end down, and completely blocked.

    Hitch an Ammeter to the power, Start the motor, and observe the radical increase in amp draw as you lift the housing to allow more air to blow out...
    This phenom, will smoke your motor in short order !!!
     
  15. gerty

    AAC Fanatic!

    Aug 30, 2007
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    If your motor is 220 volts, you don't use a neutral.
     
  16. OGRE

    Thread Starter Member

    May 31, 2013
    41
    0
    Is this motor part of a squirrel-cage blower assembly ??
    Yes mine is.

    If your motor is 220 volts, you don't use a neutral.

    Motor is 208-230V. What do I use the black Hi wire and the ground?
     
    Last edited: Jun 1, 2013
  17. OGRE

    Thread Starter Member

    May 31, 2013
    41
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    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Anymore ideas on this one guy? All the help is greatly appreciated.
     
  18. PackratKing

    Well-Known Member

    Jul 13, 2008
    850
    215
    This unit is either quite old, or foreign... I say this because of the colorcode of the wire layout... I am not familiar with what is pictured...

    Are the Blue? wires laid under the unit normally for a run capacitor... In more modern ? motors for blower application, the capacitor, if any, is on Brown & Brown w/ white stripe.
    Wiring for speed control nowadays, is white as common, with Black being high, red being lowest, and other colors are intermediate speeds...
     
  19. gerty

    AAC Fanatic!

    Aug 30, 2007
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    304
    In post #5 you appear to have it wired according to what the motor shop told you. In blowing up the picture, it doesn't appear you have the unused wires capped/taped off. If that's the case they may have touched each other/ground causing your problems. Have you tried another speed other than high ?
     
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