Need help with High Voltage DC Motor Control

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by Clint Zang, Jul 7, 2015.

  1. Clint Zang

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jun 26, 2015
    26
    0
    I'm fairly new to forums and electronics as a whole but need a little help.
    I currently use a MC-60 treadmill controller for controlling DC motors and have recently been introduced to Aduinos.
    The MC-60 uses PWM to control the speed and I would like to build a controller by useing the Arduino.
    Typically the motor ratings for treadmill motors are in the range of 90-130 Volts DC, 14-20AMPS.
    I've done a little research on attempting this and have come up with a possible circuit.
    I need another brain to look at my design and give me an idea if I'm on the right path.
    Attached is my design and also a schematic of the MC-60.
    Go easy on me, I'm a total newbe in this area, though I have a background in industrial automation engineering.
     
  2. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
    10,542
    2,369
  3. Clint Zang

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jun 26, 2015
    26
    0
    Thanks for the quick reply. I did fine that blog interesting as a later option to explore later when I learn a little more about electronics and can understand better the terms and lingo.
    I'm trying to take simple steps first, and you threw me in the deep end of the pool. I was looking for some nuging in the right direction.
    Am I heading in the right direction with my design? I don't want to emulate the MC-60 fully at this point, just get the crazy thing to spin the motor without toasting a bunch of parts for gigles.
     
  4. ScottWang

    Moderator

    Aug 23, 2012
    4,854
    767
    Should we close this thread?
    Because if a transformerless circuit that it is restriction in the Terms of Service (ToS).
     
  5. ScottWang

    Moderator

    Aug 23, 2012
    4,854
    767
    Where are the 110Vdc+ and 110Vdc- come from?
    What you mean that the 110Vdc+ and 110Vdc- is just 110Vdc+ and 0V or 110Vdc+ and 110Vdc- equal to 220Vdc?
     
  6. Clint Zang

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jun 26, 2015
    26
    0
    The 120Vdc comes from a bridge recifier. I guess it would be more correct to label them as 110Vdc+ and 0Vdc as the negative side. Like a battery would b
    e labeled.
     
  7. ScottWang

    Moderator

    Aug 23, 2012
    4,854
    767
    I am asking that where is the AC side of the bridge rectifier comes from?
     
  8. djsfantasi

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 11, 2010
    2,804
    833
    The Arduino also has PWM built into its programming language. There are several PWM pins, and the command is analogWrite(pin,dutyCycle)
     
  9. Clint Zang

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jun 26, 2015
    26
    0
    Plugged directly into house current.
     
  10. Clint Zang

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jun 26, 2015
    26
    0
    The programming side of this project should be no problem, I've programmed many different projects and have working experience with PLCs.
     
  11. ScottWang

    Moderator

    Aug 23, 2012
    4,854
    767
    That is a transformerless ps, and it is restriction in the Terms of Service (ToS).
     
  12. Clint Zang

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jun 26, 2015
    26
    0
    I don't quite understand why that would be because the circuit that I'm trying to emulate uses no transformer to power it. House current is plugged directly into the board. ???
     
  13. ScottWang

    Moderator

    Aug 23, 2012
    4,854
    767
    1. Restricted topics. The following topics are regularly raised however are considered "off-topic" at all times and will result in Your thread being closed without question:
      • Any kind of over-unity devices and systems
      • Devices designed to electrocute or shock another person
      • LEDs to mains
      • Phone jammers
      • Rail guns and high-energy projectile devices
      • Transformer-less power supplies
      If You come across a thread or post discussing any of the above topics please report the thread so We can close, and if necessary remove, the offending thread/posts.
    http://www.allaboutcircuits.com/user-agreement/

    Do you know that is the rules, as the automotive that it is just open for discussion, but this topic is not allowed yet.

    If you want to discuss this topic then you have to wait for open or go to other forums.

    Transformerless power supplies of any kind are strictly forbidden. Therefore, this thread will be closed.

    Please try to understand the reasons behind this action, and feel free to browse and use the forums.

    You might find answers to your questions in one of these forums:

    http://forum.allaboutcircuits.com/showthread.php?t=54400

    Another good forum that shares many of the same membership is http://www.electro-tech-online.com/ .

    Good luck.
     
  14. Clint Zang

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jun 26, 2015
    26
    0
     
  15. Clint Zang

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jun 26, 2015
    26
    0
    Ok, Understandable.
    Would a one to one transformer meet that requirement?
     
  16. ScottWang

    Moderator

    Aug 23, 2012
    4,854
    767
    If you could use that way then you can be discuss continuing.
    So you have to modify your circuit and repost it.
     
  17. Clint Zang

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jun 26, 2015
    26
    0
    Will do. Thanks so much for your help.
     
  18. Clint Zang

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jun 26, 2015
    26
    0
    Revised it. Hope this meets the criteria.
     
  19. ScottWang

    Moderator

    Aug 23, 2012
    4,854
    767
    Yes, thanks.
    Why you not just labeling the ACV as AC110V, 0V and AC120V, 0V?
     
  20. Clint Zang

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jun 26, 2015
    26
    0
    Yes they should be both 120 volts. Oversight on my part. Other than that does my design have any chance in working. This stuff is all a bit strange to me yet. Quite different than automation engineering.
     
Loading...