Need help IDing component

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by Kennzx91, Oct 26, 2015.

  1. Kennzx91

    Thread Starter New Member

    Oct 26, 2015
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    IMAG0082.jpg I am currently working on a machine at work and the creep control stopped working. Pulled apart the controller and this is what I found. Company that built it wants 2K to rebuild it and it would have a 45 day turn around. All that is labeled is "15A" it's a light green with a black stripe. Any help would be much appreciated.
     
  2. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
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    That looks like what we called a, "green dot diode" in 1970. A 1N4004 would be the substitute...but I'm not sure.
     
  3. GopherT

    AAC Fanatic!

    Nov 23, 2012
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    From the diameter of those leads, I would assume a the number on the device, 15A, is 15 amp diode.
     
  4. ian field

    Distinguished Member

    Oct 27, 2012
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    I'd take it out and clean up what looks like corrosion so I could measure it for any clues it might give up.

    The lead diameter might be the easiest clue to current rating that can be compared to "typical" device data sheets.

    Those glass-bead types are frequently fast recovery type - but there's no absolute rule to that, they could just as easily be standard speed.

    You can't rule out the possibility of it being a zener.
     
  5. Kennzx91

    Thread Starter New Member

    Oct 26, 2015
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    I had a little extra time before I got off work and got it out. But it came out in 3 pieces... -_- Buttttt I was able to get a full part number off of the one I pulled out. A15A.
    Did a quick search and came up with this :
    http://www.electronicsurplus.com/general-electric-a15a-diode-3amp-100v

    It's a 12 volt system. 100v seems a little over kill?
     
  6. #12

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    Nov 30, 2010
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    Last edited: Oct 26, 2015
  7. ian field

    Distinguished Member

    Oct 27, 2012
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    Its 3A, so it'd be the 100V version of the 1N540x.
     
  8. ian field

    Distinguished Member

    Oct 27, 2012
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    AFAIK: the usual spike protection devices for automotive are at least 68V. If your board doesn't have any of those - 100V may not be enough.

    The NTE cross reference comes back as a 3A 100V standard recovery diode.

    A 1N5401 would meet the specification, but I'd go for at least a 5402.
     
  9. PackratKing

    Well-Known Member

    Jul 13, 2008
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    In a situation as you face, in repairing something like this... Once you determine what caused the component to fail to begin with... Overkill in the replacement part is easily justified...

    It appears as this part failed in normal operational cycling fatigue in the circuit, as there is no other local evidence of scorching or shortcircuit...
    2K to repair their product smells like a lucrative scam.
     
  10. ian field

    Distinguished Member

    Oct 27, 2012
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    If I'd designed that - the bends wouldn't be so close to the diode encapsulation. Those glass bead diodes are usually pretty robust, but it can depend who made it.

    AFAIK: there are 1N540x clones available in the glass bead style, but I'd form the leads on the replacement so they extend out further and loop back to match the holes - a 1N540x in standard plastic package won't fit unless that is done.
     
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