Need help how to de-solder micro-b usb connector

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by zorgan, Apr 19, 2012.

  1. zorgan

    Thread Starter New Member

    Apr 15, 2012
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    I have 2x Antex soldering irons

    1x 12w
    1x 25w

    + a WEP 862D+ Soldering Station with hot air nozzles

    I have liquid solder flux
    I also have solder wick and a sucker

    I'm wanting to remove a micro-b usb connector from a blackberry curve PCB with minimal damage also have a new one to solder on

    any techniques to make the job easier?
     
  2. chrisw1990

    Active Member

    Oct 22, 2011
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    picture? the connectors come in many different forms..
     
  3. zorgan

    Thread Starter New Member

    Apr 15, 2012
    9
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    ok incomming 2mins
     
  4. zorgan

    Thread Starter New Member

    Apr 15, 2012
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    0
  5. zorgan

    Thread Starter New Member

    Apr 15, 2012
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    and the underside

    [​IMG]
     
  6. kubeek

    AAC Fanatic!

    Sep 20, 2005
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    804
    I would use soldering iron to preheat those two shielding pads, then use hot air with high temperature and airflow to get it off the board. Watch out so that you dont blow the other small components off the board with the air.
    The parts should withstand the relfow process so they should not be too likely to be damaged by too much heat.
     
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  7. KJ6EAD

    Senior Member

    Apr 30, 2011
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    The four shell connections will be the biggest problem. I would take a Dremel to the connector shell, cutting the portion with the two surface mount tabs free from the rest then bisecting the remainder. This way the thermal masses could be dealt with one at a time. Use a tape mask to keep dust out of the other parts of the circuit and use a foil shield to protect the components near the connector pins while releasing them with hot air. Your irons are a little weak so you'll probably need to use both together on the through-hole shell tabs. You might need a helper to hold one iron.
     
    zorgan likes this.
  8. Felo

    Member

    Feb 20, 2012
    91
    13
    I would use a Hot air gun, blow on it with the smallest adaptor, shield the components you don't want to remove with metal and voila!!

    What I have done, when I feel brave enough is to simply bake it at max temp in the oven, wait 5 minutes, check constantly if it is loose enough to remove.

    Note: the oven needs to be preheated.

    Happy baking!!
     
  9. KJ6EAD

    Senior Member

    Apr 30, 2011
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    You can't be serious. That approach would be more foolish than brave. ALL of the smaller parts would come loose first.
     
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  10. chrisw1990

    Active Member

    Oct 22, 2011
    543
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    id desolder the front two so it could be tilted up, then desolder one side of the rear case, then the other.. just a small gap between pad and case is enough.. and then just whack the soldering iron on all four pins, then clean it up...
    though if its being replaced cos its broken, id go for the cutting it up route. saves time. effort.
     
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  11. Felo

    Member

    Feb 20, 2012
    91
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    I am serious about it because I have done it, sure the smaller foot print components will become loose first, and it would be not so clever to do it to a PCB populated in both sides, but done carefully (meaning steady pulse, fine pliers, not moving the board abruptly) you can achieve good success rates.
     
  12. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
    16,250
    6,746
    I also vote for the "slice it up" method. The hardest part of any desoldering job is getting more than one solder joint to melt at the same time, then stay that way long enough to wiggle the part off the board, all while not lifting any copper traces or dropping SMT parts on the floor.
     
  13. BSomer

    Member

    Dec 28, 2011
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  14. KJ6EAD

    Senior Member

    Apr 30, 2011
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    Chip Quik is good on component leads but I've never heard of it being used on large thermal mass connector shells. It might be worth a little research.

    I checked the Chip Quik site and found no mention of use on connectors but it should work, theoretically.
     
    Last edited: Apr 19, 2012
  15. zorgan

    Thread Starter New Member

    Apr 15, 2012
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    0
    Just managed to check out all the replies, not long after posting I did head out to buy some new 180pcs for my dremel which was sitting in the drawer, I did manage to get the existing micro usb off (well most of it) I had a problem with the underneath part of the ground sheilding, not sure what the hell it was stuck on with but it did not want to shift from the PCB - I didn't want to contunue with the repair with risk of damaging the phone pcb, after removal of the old one I had no way to get the pins to solder on also, I did try to get the two pins at each side but I decided I was getting my head in too far, I do 100% believe there must be an easier way to do jobs like this, I do have an iron on my WEP workstation which goes up to 480 degrees (as I noticed somebody commented I don't have a hot enough iron) do I need hotter?

    I am willing to invest in better equipment I will also check out the chipquik SMD removal kit.

    I tried a hot glue gun on one side to try to hold it in place whilst soldering the rest of the points, really was not blending with the existing solder on either side (2 points)

    I also was confused at how to "tin" the 4 prongs to then attempt to put hot air on the 4 pins to try get them to weld in place, really far too fiddly - ended up putting the phone back together and telling the owner to buy two batteries and a battery charger for now!

    I really would love to learn how to do this without as much pain and frustration :)

    I believe to do such tasks as these you have to have some knowhow not only with soldering but with different techniques to make the job easier. this chipquik looks interesting.

    I want to thank each and every one of you for your input and taking the time to discuss my project, I will most certainly try to get old PCB boards and try to do more like this, I think the more I do it the better I will get.

    I'm also wanting to experiment with different distances and temps with the hot air, so i can get a good feel for what I can get away with I do however seem to think sometimes solder just doesn't want to melt!
     
    Last edited: Apr 19, 2012
  16. chrisw1990

    Active Member

    Oct 22, 2011
    543
    41
    480 is high enough, higher temperatures mean you have less time before the glue sticking the pcb layers together ends and they bubble up, i would assume, there is a thermal pad underneath, that the shell was also soldered to.. might be worth putting your iron on it for a little while and seeing if it comes off, if its a double sided board, the other possibility is that they have glued it down (as you do with the heavier components)
    though you no longer have the board so this seems redundant.. but its just about having a syringe to empty the holes of solder to put the legs in, and the patience because large thermal mass objects are a PAIN
     
  17. t06afre

    AAC Fanatic!

    May 11, 2009
    5,939
    1,222
    I often attack a desolder/rework problem. By using solder wick/desoldering tool to remove as much solder as can. Then I go for the final approach.
     
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