need help about realtime digital audio microcontroller

Discussion in 'Electronics Resources' started by angelita, Apr 20, 2010.

  1. angelita

    Thread Starter Member

    May 29, 2009
    25
    0
    hi i had a project to build an automatic audio systems for some place

    and i need to use realtime microcontroller and i dont know how to search

    please i need information about the best
    digital audio processing microcontroller

    i need a microcontroler to get rid from noise


    is there any way to get rid from echo using microcontroller
    books ..sites ..suggestion data sheet plz help
     
  2. beenthere

    Retired Moderator

    Apr 20, 2004
    15,815
    282
    What you are looking for is a DSP (digital signal processor) chip. Here is a link to a FAQ with information about several major families - http://www.bdti.com/faq/3.htm
     
  3. kingdano

    Member

    Apr 14, 2010
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  4. angelita

    Thread Starter Member

    May 29, 2009
    25
    0
    some people mention AVR but i do not know which one
     
  5. blueroomelectronics

    AAC Fanatic!

    Jul 22, 2007
    1,758
    98
    You want a DSP. The DSPIC microcontrollers have DSP, so do many more. They will say DSP in the description.
    As for programming, not a beginner project.
     
  6. Papabravo

    Expert

    Feb 24, 2006
    10,145
    1,791
    I believe the 8-bit AVR family is mostly unsuitable for a digital audio application. The AVR32 has a subfamily called the UC3 which has a greater chance of being suitable for such applications. Neither one of those is a true DSP.

    If I were you I would examine offerings from Freescale (563xx) as they have specific peripheral devices that make processing digital audio streams much easier. Next would be Analog Devices with the SHARC and Blackfin series of processors. Then TI which has an assortment of fixed and floating point parts. A dark horse would be XMOS that has a scaleable multi-threaded processor that runs faster than a scalded duck.

    Our legacy products use the 56004 from Freescale which is now well past EOL. We're deciding which way to go next.

    I completely agree with Bill. This is not a project for beginners or even most graduate engineers. Believe me when I say that it is really tough to do it right.
     
  7. angelita

    Thread Starter Member

    May 29, 2009
    25
    0
    what about
    C8051F12x and C8051F36x


    what are the things that i can do with dsp microcontroller
     
  8. Papabravo

    Expert

    Feb 24, 2006
    10,145
    1,791
    The 8051 variants are even more limited than the AVR

    What can you do with a DSP?

    1. Sample rate conversion
    2. MP3, WMA, and FLAC decoding
    3. FIR and IIR filters
    4. Format conversion
    5. Apodizing filters
    6. Pre-emphasis and de-emphasis
    Just for starters
     
  9. retched

    AAC Fanatic!

    Dec 5, 2009
    5,201
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    You DONT want to do Digital Signal Processing of any kind of complex signal (Over 4 bit) without a DSP uC.

    They are designed to use the power that is fed to them as efficently as possible for DSP tasks. A standart PIC or AVR is not.

    They are more 'generic' so-to-speak. They pass around the power pretty equally. You dont want that. You want to process signals...digitally ;)

    You CAN use 2 uCs if you are so inclined. You can use a DSP for the signal processing and a run-of-the-mill 8bit PIC for other functions, like user interfacing.

    If you want to play music in the background while the user searched through menus and the such, this will work. The 2 uCs can communicate to each other cia SPI or whatever and you can allow one to INTERRUPT the other when data needs to be passed.
     
  10. angelita

    Thread Starter Member

    May 29, 2009
    25
    0
    do i still need to use acoustic echo cancelation even the microphone too far from speakers

    and

    after the sound processing can i distribute the sound equally over speakers using dsp microcontroller ..
     
  11. blueroomelectronics

    AAC Fanatic!

    Jul 22, 2007
    1,758
    98
    Here's a bit of advice.

    Do your project on a PC before you attempt it on an embedded platform. If you can't get your algorithms working on a PC with a soundcard / microphone you have zero chance of getting it working on an embedded design.
     
  12. Audioguru

    New Member

    Dec 20, 2007
    9,411
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    I worked with very high quality boardroom tele-conferencing systems. They used digital echo cancellers so that they could transmit and receive at the same time (full duplex).

    At the beginning of each tele-conference the unit was "trained" with pink noise from the speakers so it knew the room echoes and phases which are different with the number of people present and if a door was open or closed. If something changed the echoes during a teleconference like a door opening or closing then the digital echo canceller would get confused and cause acoustical feedback howling for a few seconds.
     
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