Need assistance identifying Surface mount component on video card!

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by MrFist, Dec 7, 2012.

  1. MrFist

    Thread Starter New Member

    Dec 7, 2012
    6
    0
    Hello!

    Rcentely my video card had a little fire on what looked to be a SMD resistor. I pulled out my muti-meter and started testing the resistor to get the Ohm so I could solder in a new one.

    Every reading I got was in a range of 15ohm

    O.4 ohm
    1.5 ohm
    2.5 ohm
    15.2 ohm

    Honestly it's just all over the place

    So I assuming these components are not resistors And something else

    I don't believe I am doing something wrong but I do make mistakes time to time
    Wondering if someone could give me a hand.

    [​IMG]

    As you see there is the broken resistor.

    The one above is also broken, there is no flow able to get through


    Now below the broken row you can see a functioning row of resistors.

    I assume they are the same component due to the fact the micro print labeling the. Starts with the same abr. "SLB"

    The broken ones are SLB5, SLB6.

    The working ones are SLB9-13



    Any ideas?
     
  2. SPQR

    Member

    Nov 4, 2011
    379
    48
    What kind of video card is it?
     
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  3. absf

    Senior Member

    Dec 29, 2010
    1,493
    372
    Would you repost the picture again cos I dont see any on your post...

    Is the video card for PC slot, DVD player or USB player?

    Allen
     
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  4. MrFist

    Thread Starter New Member

    Dec 7, 2012
    6
    0
  5. MrFist

    Thread Starter New Member

    Dec 7, 2012
    6
    0
    It is a GTX 460. Video Card for PCIe.

    Reguardless if it will work again, I would just like to know what the hell those SMDs are.

    Like I said.

    I know all of those are the same.


    But, when I Muti-Meter them I get Ohm's that are inconstant from .5 - 50 ohm.

    any ideas what the SMD is?
     
  6. ARSiq

    New Member

    Nov 23, 2012
    9
    2
    For me it looks like coils, not resistors.
     
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  7. THE_RB

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 11, 2008
    5,435
    1,305
    Some sort of MOV protectors from a power bus to ground.
     
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  8. dataman19

    Member

    Dec 26, 2009
    136
    29
    OK - Now I get it... You need to position the photos in the same orientation/viewing plane.... It took a while to figure out which edge of the board the resistors were on....
    ...
    1st: You said the Video Card was smoked? I don't really see any smoke damage - but concede (I think) that you must be talking about the Voltage Reference Resistor (the ones you are shown as bad are also voltage reference resistors).
    ...
    Some versions of this Video Card requires a 4-Pin to 6-Pin Aux power adapter. If you do not hook up the power adapter before powering the computer with the card installed the voltage reference resistors will burn out shortly after power up (may be 3 minutes, may be 10 minutes - but they will blow). If you have a card with Part Number CGNX-TS45024ZCI - then you have one that does not require the Aux Power Adapter (the better cards do however require the power adapter). This is just food for thought.
    ..
    Also the economy model (the one that doesn't use a 4-pin to 6-Pin Aux power adapter) Is not as fast as reference GTS 450. It's not really an actual GTS 450. This model has less CUDA cores (144 vs 192), lower GPU clock (700MHz vs 783MHz) and slower DDR3 memory instead of GDDR5.
    ...
    2nd: You said the card is bad. Does it work? If not what are the symptoms (ie: will not configure, will not recognize, will not power up at all... etc) I get the smoked resistors (if you clean the burned components off and clean the solder pads, then reinstall - what does the card do? If anything.
    ...
    3rd: Are you trying to run the computer with this card using only a 400EW-450W power supply" Bad idea. This card sucks power, and you need at least 400-Watts dedicated to "this card" - meaning you should use a 600-watt power supply. Trying to run the Video card with an insufficient power supply will result in two possible issues :the first being what you have - burned components:: The second being system shut down.
    ..
    Still, not enough photos and not enough background to truly troubleshoot.. Complicated by the lack of technical service data for this card (Most Video Cards are made in Tiawan or China - so service literature and schematics are hard to come by. You can try ohm measurements to identify which of the pins that the burned components go to. Then look up the Pin Out Diagram fro the Standard PCIe Slot to figure out which functions are affected by these components. Then compare the components to the same components on other PCIe standard cards. If they are voltage or sensory reference resistors, the PCIe standard would dictate that the references as far as pin signals be within a standard range. Therefore another PCIe card would most likely use the same reference/load resistors (Not set in stone, but ball park enough to get you up and operational - besides, if they turn out to be hyper critical - you will see it right away as inability to attaining a higher resolution, or slight distortions related to reference clock or sync signals)
    ...
    Attached is a PCIe Slot Pin Out Diagram to help you.
    ...
    Let me know what you find.
    ..
    Dave
    Phoenix, AZ
     
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  9. MrFist

    Thread Starter New Member

    Dec 7, 2012
    6
    0

    This was an old graphics card that broke roughly 6 months ago.
    My current Build is a finely tuned machine.


    Back to the GTX 460 SE.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    In my old build it was running fine. I have it amply Over Clocked giving out a 20% increase in clock speed. But with a increase of 15% voltage.

    After 5 months of this over clocking, I powered up my Build and Saw a flash and white/grey smoke coming from that damaged SMD.

    It was glowing white with smoke coming off.

    I turned off my build and took the card and put it into a anti-static bag so one day I could spend time on it (when I had time).

    Now that I have time, I took off the custom/rigged heatsink And took a peak at the overall shape of the Card.

    There were no visible damages anywhere EXPECT for SLB6.

    There are a toatle of 15 SMDs Labled SLB

    SLB6 is the only visible damaged SMD

    When I used a muti-meter to test for resistor ohm I recieved no signal.

    The same applied to SLB5

    so to my conclusion SLB5 AND SLB6 are indeed broken.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    When I used a muti-meter on all the other SLB Components I ranged from 0.5 Ohm to 5.0 Ohm. Overall I never had a consistent Ohm resistance.

    80% of the time though I did get around 1 Ohm.

    In this case than I would like to believe the SMD component I am looking at is indeed a resistor with 1 Ohm @ 10% - 50% tolerance. The tolerance i think must be high due to the extreme range of reading I am getting.

    Am i getting various readings because it is not a resistor? Or is it because of the extra 15% voltage I added to the system caused all the resistors tolerance to reach a peak of 75%?

    If the component Is resistor, which Ohm should I buy to replace it?
    If it is not a resistor any ideas on what component it could be?
     
  10. MrFist

    Thread Starter New Member

    Dec 7, 2012
    6
    0
    Do you think the Surface Mount Components labeled SLB are Voltage Reference Resistor? If so, how should I test the ones that are not damaged to find out which one I need to buy?
     
  11. MrFist

    Thread Starter New Member

    Dec 7, 2012
    6
    0
    How should I go about replacing them? as far as getting the right part
     
  12. dataman19

    Member

    Dec 26, 2009
    136
    29
    Unfortunately - most SMD devices are not clearly marked as one would think. They are marked - but the bad news is that the markings would most likely be destroyed by component failure.
    ..
    I would suggest you trace the component leads back to the pins of the Card (or the pins of the SMD IC's etc. At least you can compare the circuit you think you have with a known one. Thereby surmising what the components actually are. his takes a little bit of time, but can be done. I have done it more than once - In fact when I get back to the lab I think I might have notes on one of these cards - maybe even a reasonable facilmile of a schematic.
    ...
    I will not be back in the lab until some time after Christmas. Right now I am dealing with my Mother's Funeral planning. This is taking up most of my time. But even though I am dealing with relatives from all over the country, and issues with getting her laid to rest in her final resting place, I love my forums, and get relief from my real world problems reading the posts - always have.
    ...
    I will devote a lot more time after next weekend to your Video Card. Not promising to solve your problem, I know there are a lot of better problem solvers here. But I know I can probably figure it out - especially if I find one of these cards in one of our junk boxes. We fix so many motherboards and SMD device electronics (Including Pro Audio/Video Gear - including Broadcast Studio equipment) that we have a hell of a junk box. Since I am a pack rat I tend to have as many as five or six gaylords full of electronics assemblies. We do a lot of scrapping and gold recovery - but video cards like this one would never be scrapped on my watch until totally scanned, and scavenged. So I would bet have one, or a close cousin to one.
    ...
    Another tip would be to find a similar card with the same video chip set (or should I say "Video Driver Chip Set"). I find it literally amazing how similar many within the same product year can be. Sure, they have more Video Ports, and may have two sets of Video Driver Chips, variable and different scan ranges and resolution, but this function is more of a support chip set issue than a single chip set family. One infamous video card family of the 2009 time frame had four different video cards, different series numbers - but the difference was only the DDR memory, and one model had two DVI outputs - But the Video Graphics Engine was the same (since the Video Graphics Chip Set supported up to four Video outputs, but only used one and two??? - Same chip set was used two years later in a Quad Video Card set.... Amazing??? And I thought only the Car Companies recycled model year designs....)
    ...
    In the mean time, I am sure one of the super techs here will eventually chime in and maybe even come up with a factory schematic. At that point, you would only need to order the appropriate components.
    ...
    Incidentally, overclocking may be the rage - but many of the modern component cards do not have heavy duty voltage regulation, and voltage and power management may be getting cheaper- but at even $1.95 cost at production could keep it out of a sub $500 video card.
    ...
    If you do come up with a factory schematic (or production drawing) - take careful note of the voltage and power management devices. If you are planning to continue over clocking and boosting voltages - change the Voltage tolerances (many will be at the 5Vdc or 10Vdc type - raise them to 10Vdc and 16Vdc - ie: the 3.3V 1.0A regulators should be replaced with 3.3V 1,5A or even 2.0 Amp ones.). Many a high end video graphics card has been fried by over clocker's (I know I'm preaching to the choir, I just gotta say it).
    ..
    Still, tinkering is the fruit of the quest for further knowledge and understanding. Without the exploratory or inquisitive, we wouldn't have any technological advances.
    ..
    Keep on truckin.....
    ..
    Dave
    Phoenix, AZ
     
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