need a good topic for seminar

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by vineetmad, May 15, 2009.

  1. vineetmad

    Thread Starter New Member

    Mar 23, 2009
    2
    0
    plz help me..people out there..

    need a good , fresh topic for seminar(related to electronics and communication)

    and plz suggest topics on which i could find some stuffs too......thanx in advance
     
  2. KL7AJ

    AAC Fanatic!

    Nov 4, 2008
    2,039
    287

    How to make a fortune as an electronics geek in a lame economy.

    I think we need to show a lot of techs and engineers the importance of startup companies. Everyone should know about how H-P got started in a garage....such opportunities still abound.

    A few of us local corporate "expatriates" have started a small custom instrumentation business...not much more than a "cottage shop" now, but it looks like it may take off soon.

    We shouldn't be at the mercy of available jobs...we should be CREATING new jobs and industries.

    Eric
     
  3. PRS

    Well-Known Member

    Aug 24, 2008
    989
    35
    Give us some examples, please. Just what type of topics are you looking for?
     
  4. THE_RB

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 11, 2008
    5,435
    1,305
    Topic; "How introducing pure hydrogen into the intake manifold of gasoline powered automobile causes acute mental retardation of the automobile driver".
    :)
     
  5. PRS

    Well-Known Member

    Aug 24, 2008
    989
    35
    Squirt a little oxygen in there and see what happens!
     
  6. vineetmad

    Thread Starter New Member

    Mar 23, 2009
    2
    0
    thnx to all
     
  7. radiohead

    Active Member

    May 28, 2009
    474
    31
    I would say experimentation in magnetics. It's a fascinating field to me personally. Serioulsly, if you want to make a good presentation seminar, pick a subject that personally intrests you and do extensive research. when you are done with your research, you should end up with way more information than you will need for your presentation. The hard part is deciding what to cut out. After that, the very hardest part is conducting "dry runs" practicing your presentation to an empty room over and over until you get it right. Maybe you can have a friend sit through it and give you some honest constructive criticism on what you need to do to improve it. Presentations go like this... 1. The hook, get them interested. 2. keep them interested (hardest part) 3. summary 4. Q & A 5. credits and thanks to those who helped you with your work.
     
  8. PRS

    Well-Known Member

    Aug 24, 2008
    989
    35
    Sorry, vineetmad, I didn't mean to make light of your request.

    I think a good topic would be the effect of lightning on aircraft; especially flight 455. The nature of lightning, its hazards, a history of protection from lightning starting with Ben Franklin's lightning rod. One question I have is the effect of lightning on an aluminum surface 7 miles above ground. Since the electric potential is , presumably, uniform all around the plane, where is the shock hazard?
     
  9. beenthere

    Retired Moderator

    Apr 20, 2004
    15,815
    282
    More topical is that Airbus that just went down. Something about aluminum wiring being not too smart in aircraft applications. Or non-redundant flight controls - fly-by-wire doesn't work well without power.
     
  10. flat5

    Active Member

    Nov 13, 2008
    403
    17
    "Since the electric potential is , presumably, uniform all around the plane, where is the shock hazard? "

    Perhaps that is a poor assumption. The voltage is very high and very short lived. I think there may be great potential for a potential difference from one part of the plane to another.
    ---

    I like Bill's suggestion. I worked for a company that made a world class product. They made two of the best "Proof of Performance" test instruments for TV and FM broadcast transmitters. The company was owned and started in a garage by an engineer from Hong Kong. When I worked for them (1979-1982) they were next door to Intel in Santa Clara, Ca. (Wish I had bought Intel stock)
     
    Last edited: Jun 2, 2009
  11. PRS

    Well-Known Member

    Aug 24, 2008
    989
    35
    Yes, I think it may be a matter of differing potentials between two points of the plane.
     
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