Need 100 Times Gain at 2GHz

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by slavano, May 27, 2016.

  1. slavano

    Thread Starter New Member

    May 10, 2016
    7
    0
    Hello,

    I am working on a project and need some assistance. I am try to take a pulse that, at max, has a 2GHz frequency. The pulse is about 30mV and I need it to be at about 2.2V for it to be picked up by an arduino's digital pin (max tolerance is 3.3V). I have been searching on Digikey for an op amp that would work but have had no success. Does anyone know of a chip or circuit that could do this for me? Thank you in advanced!
     
  2. bertus

    Administrator

    Apr 5, 2008
    15,649
    2,348
    Hello,

    Perhaps an ERA3 might do the trick:
    ERA and MAR MMIC's

    But do you think that the arduino can work with 2GHz pulses?

    Bertus
     
  3. slavano

    Thread Starter New Member

    May 10, 2016
    7
    0
    We are getting the pulses from a Sibm which is receiving photons from a sintilator. At the moment we are getting that high of frequencies from a control source which is much stronger than what the end aplication will be. So the arduino probably won't read that fast however we do have plans for that issue moving forward.

    Also, that chip looks fast enough however it does not state the level of gain that we require. Do you think it can boost as high as we need?
     
  4. SLK001

    Well-Known Member

    Nov 29, 2011
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    229
    The Mini-Circuits monolythic gain blocks have gains of 20dB, which is a gain of 100.
     
  5. Papabravo

    Expert

    Feb 24, 2006
    10,173
    1,797
    I believe the Arduino has no chance of seeing such a pulse. Where do such bizarre notions come from? Beats the hell out of me!
     
  6. slavano

    Thread Starter New Member

    May 10, 2016
    7
    0
    Oh okay, sorry a little new. For simplicity do you all know of an op amp that could do a similar task?
     
  7. Papabravo

    Expert

    Feb 24, 2006
    10,173
    1,797
    To get that gain at that frequency you will need to employ careful layout and diligent impedance matching techniques. Do you have the equipment to characterize the devices?
     
  8. slavano

    Thread Starter New Member

    May 10, 2016
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    0
    If you mean matching the impedance then yes.
     
  9. crutschow

    Expert

    Mar 14, 2008
    13,056
    3,245
    We mean a network analyzer that can work at 2GHz.
     
    Papabravo likes this.
  10. DickCappels

    Moderator

    Aug 21, 2008
    2,664
    634
    The input circuitry on a AVR ("Arduino" to some) is like a low pass filter, I guess around 50 MHz, and the fastest legitimate clock rate for an AVR is 20 MHz. A good approach might be to make a fast detector using a comparator (Like the LM710 or a newer one) and use the comparator's output to drive the controler's input pin.

    How many scintillations per second do you expect to have to handle? The counter on AVR's can handle up to 10 MHz. If you need faster, either add an outboard counter or use a PIC (because PICs don't have the same input clocking restrictions).
     
  11. SLK001

    Well-Known Member

    Nov 29, 2011
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    Yeah, I was going to mention that, but I believe that this thread is going nowhere but absolute failure on the TS's part.
     
  12. GopherT

    AAC Fanatic!

    Nov 23, 2012
    6,071
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    The problem with a first-year graduate student learning a bunch of technical words and not understanding the physical limitations of technology or the practical solutions scientists before him/her used to solved these problems. He/she will soon be working rotating shifts at an QC lab in a chemical factory or, if he/she gets a swift kick from a professor, they might get a degree.
     
  13. Lestraveled

    Well-Known Member

    May 19, 2014
    1,957
    1,215
    Do you need to simply detect the presence of the pulse? A Mini-Circuits, ZX47-40+, is a power detector that works from 10 Mhz to 8 Ghz.

    Minicircuits.com
     
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