navigation lights

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by whitearrow, Jul 5, 2010.

  1. whitearrow

    Thread Starter Member

    Jan 6, 2009
    13
    0
    Can anyone help me in building a simple navigation lights circuit with relays that when one bulb is blown a buzzer will goes on and can change to another spare bulb by a selector switch? Ideally the buzzer can be reseted each time an alarm sounds so that it will not keep buzzing all the time. I need also an indication lamp which shows which navigation bulbs are on, and which also goes off when the navigation bulb is blown and the buzzer sounds on. The supply voltage is 220V 60Hz and the circuit is intended to switch on 4 navigation lights (8 at all with the other 4 as spares).
     
  2. Dx3

    Member

    Jun 19, 2010
    87
    7
    Tell me more about these "navigation" lights.
    How many watts do they use (each)?
    Are they on your model train?
    Are they for an airport?
    Will people die if they fail?
    Which country are you in?
     
  3. Dx3

    Member

    Jun 19, 2010
    87
    7
    Do the bulbs flash on and off?
    Have the bulbs been purchased?
    Could I specify special bulbs if necessary?
     
  4. SgtWookie

    Expert

    Jul 17, 2007
    22,182
    1,728
    Hmm. Not an aircraft, as they generally have 115v 3-phase 400Hz systems, with a 28V DC bus. Civilian light aircraft are generally 12v DC systems.

    Small personal watercraft would generally use 12v DC.

    220VAC 60Hz is kind of an odd duck. I'd expect 240V 60Hz or 220V 50Hz.

    A current transformer would be one way to tell if there is current flowing through the bulb. If the current transformer has an output, there's continuity through the bulb.

    Most incandescent bulb failures occur when power is first applied to a cold filament. The inrush current and rapid change of temperature is what kills them. If the filament is allowed to warm up slowly, they will last much longer.

    If the primary nav lamps fail and secondary lamps are available, it should be considered a "maintenance required soon" type of an event rather than an emergency. Having a loud alarm sound could distract the pilot/captain/driver/etc at a critical moment. A less obtrusive "fault lamp" type indicator (monitoring required on a checklist) might be more appropriate, with a corresponding indication that secondary lighting is functional/operating.

    If both primary AND secondary systems fail, then you DO have a relatively high-priority event that the pilot/captain/driver must be made aware of.

    The secondary system could have low current flowing through the filaments constantly, to keep them warm and reduce the possibility of lens fogging, to reduce the possibility of failure if they are called on for use, and to provide constant monitoring of their state of readiness.

    Just some ideas to ponder.
     
  5. whitearrow

    Thread Starter Member

    Jan 6, 2009
    13
    0
    the bulbs are 65W 220V 50/60Hz and if they fail no one would die :) these are to be fitted on a personal boat which has a marine generator of 220V 60Hz. the bulbs does not flash and no the bulbs should be of special marine navigation lighting because they have to fit some special marine holders. the four bulbs are the port and starboard lights (left/red and right/green) anchor light and a stern light. if you require other information pls ask
     
  6. SgtWookie

    Expert

    Jul 17, 2007
    22,182
    1,728
    What is the wattage of the bulbs?

    Manufacturer and part number will help to locate a datasheet.
     
  7. beenthere

    Retired Moderator

    Apr 20, 2004
    15,815
    282
    That is less of a problem than
    Can you describe the holders? How do the bulbs make contact?

    Anything look familiar at the link? - http://www.alibaba.com/showroom/p28s-lamp-holder.html
     
  8. atferrari

    AAC Fanatic!

    Jan 6, 2004
    2,648
    764
    If your boat is classified you should ask for thechnical specs to the Society.

    In this forum I read quite often, posts refusing to advice on whatever is related to cars' safety. I am affraid that your question involves something directly related to safety as well.

    I do not know how big your boat is or where is the area of navigation where it will be involved. Please do not take chances.
     
  9. JoeJester

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 26, 2005
    3,373
    1,159
    Can we assume you've complied with UL 1104, UL Standard for Safety for Marine Navigation Lights?
     
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