NASA introduces Asteroid watch

Discussion in 'General Science' started by bertus, Aug 3, 2009.

  1. bertus

    Thread Starter Administrator

    Apr 5, 2008
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  2. beenthere

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    There is a crater about 1.5 km across in Arizona from an impact (the Beringer crater, very visible with Google Earth).

    Almost is a mater of degree and velocity. Inside the atmosphere, think of shock waves and comression heating enough to generate X-rays. I would want to be on the other side of the planet.
     
  3. Wendy

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    Ever read Heinlein's "The Moon is a Harsh Mistress"? I suspect his was the first story to describe kinetic weapons of this magnitude. One of his better stories, I think.

    Even a relatively small impact will get peoples attention.
     
  4. beenthere

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    Sure did. Read all of his stuff. Now I'm collecting his juveniles for my grandson.

    High speed anything is pretty scary when it passes close by.
     
  5. Dave

    Retired Moderator

    Nov 17, 2003
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    Take a look at the Vredefort crater which is the largest verified on Earth: [​IMG]

    ~180 miles across.

    I'm sure there are bigger, just not verified at this stage.

    Dave
     
  6. SigmaCeq

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    Good grief. I hope the media doesn't catch onto that site and fill our heads with needless "end of the world" nonsense! :)
     
  7. Wendy

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    Actually it is one of the few things they could hype that would have real meat, as opposed to others I've seen.

    Earth is one of a kind, it's worth protecting.
     
  8. beenthere

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    You would have to hope they could really do more than yell "stand out from under" real loud. It's one thing to see one coming, and another to do a course change on what might be millions of tons of mass.
     
  9. fanie

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    Earth is entering a stream of dusty debris from Comet Swift-Tuttle, the source of the annual Perseid meteor shower. Although the shower won't peak until August 11th and 12th, the show is already getting underway.

    We're just in the outskirts of the debris stream now. If you go out at night and stare at the sky, you'll probably only see a few Perseids per hour."According to Science at NASA the Earth passes through the densest part of the debris stream sometime on 12 August when dozens of meteors can be seen per hour.

    Perseids can appear in any part of the sky, their tails all pointing back to the shower's radiant in the constellation Perseus. For Radio Amateurs meteor showers provide increased opportunities for meteor scatter communication. Since 2000, several digital modes implemented by computer programs have replaced voice and Morse code communications in popularity.

    Copied from

    http://www.sarl.org.za/public/_news/AutoArticle.asp?ArtNo=4
     
  10. fanie

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    Here is what can give you an idea of our size in space.

    http://www.rayfowler.org/2008/01/14/the-size-of-the-earth-compared-to-other-objects-in-space/

    Now imagine one of thos big mothers comes flying past earth. It won't even know we were in it's way :eek: It's gravity will pluck us towards it like a magnet.

    Chances of survival, well, maybe better if you grit your teeth. Even if the gravity on such a larger mass is only 50 times that of earth, a 100kg guy will weigh 5000kg. Don't expect high jump records any time soon :D
     
  11. fanie

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  12. Wendy

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    The odds of a really big planet is pretty small, it's the mile wide suckers we have to worry about. There are a LOT more of them. Worrying about a planet hitting us is like worrying about the sun going nova, it could happen, but not likely in the extreme.

    Which is kinda the point of the exercise. If you see it and have time, you can do something about it. We're new at this, but I bet it would focus everyones attention admirably.
     
  13. ELECTRONERD

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    May 26, 2009
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    Did you guys hear how NASA is also going to an empty fuel tank from part of a rocket into the moon at 18km per second or something? This will creat a cone of dust, and using the suns light, a sattelite will take the color off of each element to determine whether or not the moon has water. They think that we could inhabit the moon. I don't think this is possible, our bodies weren't meant to live on the moon or any other planet known.
     
  14. Wendy

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    And the moon landings were a hoax, because that wasn't possible either. Very close to the same logic there. We were meant to do whatever we can do, and unlike some things historical, this is ethical.

    How long has the space station been up? It's not our first you know, both Russia and USA have had previous models. The Antartica Station is as hostile as any moon base would be, but we've maintained it for decades.

    Not only possible, but doable. Whether it will thrive is another question. Someone should introduce you to some good SciFi.
     
    Last edited: Aug 7, 2009
  15. scythe

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    Mar 23, 2009
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    I'm sure we could inhabit the moon (if enough of us were ever motivated enough...), but what would be the effects on human physiology? That's the real question. I suppose a loss in bone density could easily be predicted. And with no real atmosphere, asteroids would pose a much bigger problem to people on the moon than on earth...

    BTW, anyone see the 2002 remake of the time machine? ^^ I guess that's proof that we shouldn't attempt to live there... lol
     
  16. ELECTRONERD

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    May 26, 2009
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    Exactly my point. I think that it could be possible, but it is far too dangerous. Our technology isn't quite advanced enough. Bone loss would be a problem and asteroids could be shooting from everywhere.
     
  17. Wendy

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    Did you see the vehicle that launched from Earth (Saturn V) vs. the vehicle that launched from the moon (lunar lander)? That is just one of many advantages. We are ravaging this earth in search of resources like metals, which are either floating around or laying around out there.

    Basically the ones that thrive find new ways of doing things, the opportunities beyond Earth are vast. Like I said, your imagination has been severely stunted. I recommend some Heinlein SciFi in massive doses until it improves. :D

    We can sit around and hope things get better, or get moving and make it better. People die either way, how you die is important.

    As for the effects of living in 1/6 gee, there will be problems, but there could be benifits. If the heart doesn't have to work as hard, and wear and tear on joints is reduce, it is possible you could see some dramatic increases in lifespans (another old scifi concept). Fear of what might happen is worse than finding out you can't do something the way you first though, because you'll probably figure it out in the end.
     
    Last edited: Aug 15, 2009
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