my transformer has 4 outputs 2 inputs?

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by DigitalApocalypse, Apr 29, 2013.

  1. DigitalApocalypse

    Thread Starter New Member

    Apr 29, 2013
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    hi all. This is my first time posting. I have aquired a transformer with 4 outputs and 2 inputs. I dont understand, i thought they were supposed to have only 2 outputs (pos and neg) thanks for help in advance.
     
  2. tracecom

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 16, 2010
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    Transformers have a primary (input) winding and one or more secondary (output) windings. Each winding usually requires two wires. Your transformer apparently has two secondary windings, which may be for two different voltages. It should be marked on the transfomer somewhere; if not, look for a datasheet for the transformer.

    Oh, and because transformers are only for AC (alternating current,) there are no positive and negative wires.
     
  3. crutschow

    Expert

    Mar 14, 2008
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    3,236
    The outputs could be either two separate output windings or one winding with taps for different voltages. You can determine that by measuring the resistance between all the wires. If they all have continuity with each other then it is a tapped winding. If there is continuity with only one other wire, then it has two isolated secondaries.

    Windings don't have polarity but they do have phase. Thus, depending upon how they are connected, two separate outputs could be in-phase or 180 degrees out-of-phase. That's important in case you want to connect two output in series to get more voltage or in parallel to get more current.
     
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  4. BillB3857

    Senior Member

    Feb 28, 2009
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    There are transformers that have two primary windings. These are designed for dual voltage input. The low voltage mode is with the two primary windings in parallel, and if they are in series, it is for high voltage. These transformers may also have multiple secondary windings.
     
  5. ErnieM

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 24, 2011
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    Just do yourself one huge favor and do NOT connect this transformer to the AC line unless you are 100 percent sure of the connections.

    Failure to heed this may result in an analog apocalypse.
     
  6. BMorse

    Senior Member

    Sep 26, 2009
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    most Geiger counters use high voltage to activate the Geiger Tube, in most configurations they will use the 2 secondary windings as power inputs and use the primary windings to power the tube, basically using it to step up the voltage, as in this diagram >>> http://kripton2035.free.fr/Resources/drsb.gif
     
  7. DigitalApocalypse

    Thread Starter New Member

    Apr 29, 2013
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    thanks. Is how can i find out which are connected to which coils?
     
  8. tracecom

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 16, 2010
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    Look at the transformer for model numbers, and Google for a datasheet. The datasheet should tell you all about the transformer.

    Post some clear, close-up pictures; chances are there is someone here who will recognize the transformer and can tell you about it.
     
  9. BMorse

    Senior Member

    Sep 26, 2009
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    Or post a few pictures of the top side and bottom side of the PCB. Pictures really do wonders on this forum when it comes down to trying to troubleshoot your issues. A model number of the Geiger counter would also help in trying to google for a schematic diagram
     
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