My draft timetable is out ;)

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by TBayBoy, Jul 29, 2011.

  1. TBayBoy

    Thread Starter Member

    May 25, 2011
    148
    19
    Got a first look at my new timetable for school in September, looks good I may have a whole day off during the week. :) (excluding weekends of course)
     
  2. TBayBoy

    Thread Starter Member

    May 25, 2011
    148
    19
    Well the arduous registration is over, 5 hours to complete... damn network :(

    but I got all my classes
    [​IMG]

    and a bonus traffic light circuit :)
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  3. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
    20,766
    2,536
    Have you been to Bill Bowden's site? One of the better hobby sites out there for electronics. Although simple, I really like his traffic light system.

    http://www.bowdenshobbycircuits.info/
     
  4. TBayBoy

    Thread Starter Member

    May 25, 2011
    148
    19
    Thanks Bill, good find :) For this assignment we could only use AND, OR, NAND, NOR, and inverters.

    But bill's site gives me all sorts of ideas for play :)
     
  5. Sparky49

    Active Member

    Jul 16, 2011
    834
    417
    What are those credits?

    I've never seen that in the UK.:confused:
     
  6. TBayBoy

    Thread Starter Member

    May 25, 2011
    148
    19
    I need so many credits to graduate, seems the number of credits is based on the number of hours of classroom, 45 for 3 hours a week, 60 for 4 hours, 75 for 5 hours, etc. ~300 to 360 credits per semester for full time student status
     
  7. TBayBoy

    Thread Starter Member

    May 25, 2011
    148
    19
    How do you know your done college in the UK?
     
  8. Sparky49

    Active Member

    Jul 16, 2011
    834
    417
    College... That's about 17/18/19 years old?

    If it is then we have a slightly different system known as 6th form. It's alot like normal school, (for me anyway). Just turn up to lessons and pass the exams.
     
  9. TBayBoy

    Thread Starter Member

    May 25, 2011
    148
    19
    Well first we have pre-school, then primary, kindergarten to grade 8, then secondary school grade 9 to 12 or 13, then post secondary, university or college.

    For me I have 1 year of pre-tech, then three years of Electrical Engineering - Computer Control.

    So you have no requirements to carry a minimum class load?
     
  10. Sparky49

    Active Member

    Jul 16, 2011
    834
    417
    If your attendance isn't up to scratch, then you're given a couple of warnings and then kicked out.

    I guess it's more at the discretion of the teachers and the school to how 'strict' they are.

    If you're the sort of kid who'll turn up late and might skip a day or two a week, then I'd imagine you'd be kicked out pretty quick.

    But if you've had to take a few days off because for illness or for family matters or whatever, then you'd probably be fine.
     
  11. TBayBoy

    Thread Starter Member

    May 25, 2011
    148
    19
    Ya, there are minimum attendance requirements here too, I figured our two systems would be fairly similar, as so much is between the countries.
     
    Sparky49 likes this.
  12. JoeJester

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 26, 2005
    3,373
    1,159
    Sparky,

    I would think they wouldn't kick you out as they got your "fee" for the class. You might not pass and have to take it again, at the normal price, but they might not kick you out.

    Disenrollment is usually on the students shoulders.
     
    Sparky49 likes this.
  13. TBayBoy

    Thread Starter Member

    May 25, 2011
    148
    19
    Ya, last semester there was a student who didn't attend enough, and they will have to re do that class before they can graduate, fortunately it was not a class that was a pre-requisite for any other classes.
     
    Sparky49 likes this.
  14. BillO

    Well-Known Member

    Nov 24, 2008
    985
    136
    In Canada, college is post secondary. Not at the same academic level as university, but beyond Form 6 or 'A' levels. You would enter out of high school (after your 12 or 13 year of schooling) and undertake a 1,2 or 3 year program that leads to some sort of certification. College is usually more practical (hands-on) than is undergraduate university and the emphasis is on getting real useable skills in the area of study rather than a general academic education.

    Suffice it to say, a diploma from college prepares one for the workplace better than a 3 or 4 year undergraduate degree from university. An undergraduate degree is really not worth much without some post-graduate work. The exception might be in the engineering diciplines. For instance, there is not much call for undergraduate physicists, mathematicians, biologists, chemists, sociologists, psychologists, philosophers, English majors, French majors, fine arts majors, etc. At least not in Canada.
     
  15. Sparky49

    Active Member

    Jul 16, 2011
    834
    417
    That's 'cause engineers rule.:D
     
  16. Zazoo

    Member

    Jul 27, 2011
    114
    43
    That is typically the case here in the US as well. Even advanced degrees won't help you in a number of those fields due to limited demand and oversupply. It's why I opted for engineering over the sciences when I made the decision to return to school.
    There are PhD professors in the english and humanities departments at my school who make 1/2 of what a BS engineer can secure fresh out of school.
    It's unfortunate :(
     
  17. TBayBoy

    Thread Starter Member

    May 25, 2011
    148
    19
    I can't speak for every place, but the college i go to the profs are very approachable with extra help and info.
     
Loading...