my 555 circuit board timer

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by brozizds, Oct 8, 2010.

  1. brozizds

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Aug 15, 2010
    135
    0
    I have been working on this project http://forum.allaboutcircuits.com/showpost.php?p=281440&postcount=27
    for some time with Bill Marsden's great layouts with very good results on my protoboards but now applying them to a circuit board not so . I tried using a circuit writer conductive pen but it seems like I'm losing voltage the further away I am from my 9V power supply. Is this common? Should I try etching( which I've never done:confused:) or just hard wire this project? remember I am a newbie! HELP
     
  2. bertus

    Administrator

    Apr 5, 2008
    15,635
    2,342
    Hello,

    I found this in the project collection.
    Over there only completed projects (with the complete documentation) should be posted.

    Bertus
     
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  3. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
    20,764
    2,534
    I suspect you are hand drawing this, correct?

    Show us your layout, scan it in as a file, then attach it. We'll look at it and help find the problem.

    Being a really lazy grunt, I've been known to built them surface mount style, so I don't have to drill holes. My personal favorite style is to breadboard them on a perf board, similar to the style found here.

    Project: High Power LED Flasher
     
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  4. SgtWookie

    Expert

    Jul 17, 2007
    22,182
    1,728
    The "conductive pen" traces will have a pretty high resistance compared to a piece of wire or a normal etched circuit board trace.

    You might consider the "dead bug" technique; you epoxy your components leads-up on a copper clad board, and use the copper board surface as a ground plane as well as a heat sink.
     
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  5. marshallf3

    Well-Known Member

    Jul 26, 2010
    2,358
    201
    I tend to classify that "conductive ink" right along with "liquid solder" and "liquid steel" - it's glue with powdered metal in it
     
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