Motorola transistor ID help

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by Kermit2, Nov 9, 2010.

  1. Kermit2

    Thread Starter AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 5, 2010
    3,771
    929
    I'm pretty sure that the unique shaped M is a symbol for Motorola, but I'm not having any luck with my usual Google efforts on these two.

    They only differ by 1 and 0 in the last digit and a 'P' and 'N' in the prefix, so I'm assuming a NPN-PNP set?

    Anyone else ever see these beasties?

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  2. Artikbot

    Member

    Nov 7, 2010
    45
    1
    From what I got off a pretty exhaustive Google search, they seem to be RF power transistors from microwaves (some pages say up to 175W?)

    How big are them?
     
  3. Kermit2

    Thread Starter AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 5, 2010
    3,771
    929
    Did you find a datasheet? I guess you'd have posted it, if you did?

    :(

    Here's the funny part...I've got nearly two hundred of the PST-1000's and about half as many of the NST-1001's.

    Bat ****,
     
  4. Artikbot

    Member

    Nov 7, 2010
    45
    1
    No, just some random references on some pages... But no datasheets >.<

    Might be this, but on a different package?

    http://www.jameco.com/Jameco/Products/ProdDS/1403215.pdf

    Just the BCE engraving on your part (let's call it "part" because we don't even know if it's a transistor after all... It looks like, but who knows) doesn't match...


    Wow, it's gonna be tough to find what is it xD
     
  5. retched

    AAC Fanatic!

    Dec 5, 2009
    5,201
    312
    BCE is BASE, COLLECTOR, EMITTER

    It shows pinout...it just so happens to be the pinout of a transistor. ;)
     
  6. Kermit2

    Thread Starter AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 5, 2010
    3,771
    929
    :) I've got a regulator(7805 I think) that has EBC stamped into it.

    If I remember I'll post up the picture.
     
  7. Artikbot

    Member

    Nov 7, 2010
    45
    1
    Obvious statement is obvious.

    I'm just sceptical, because as Kermit said, leading manufacturers (especially from the US) tend to engrave whatever they want without following any rules.
     
  8. marshallf3

    Well-Known Member

    Jul 26, 2010
    2,358
    201
    EBC may just have been part of the encapsulation mold they used, it may not indicate lead identity but an ohm meter can shed some light on that.

    I seriously doubt they're 175W microwave transistors or there would be a metal tab to mount them to a heat sink.

    Perhaps a distant shot in the dark but send an e-mail to Motorola and see if they'll help.

    If they're in a TO-92 case and a meter shows them to be a transistor they're probably about the same as a 2N3904/6 pair, possibly with different gain, frequency, voltage &/or current ratings.
     
  9. Kermit2

    Thread Starter AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 5, 2010
    3,771
    929
    They came out of military equipment, but they are NOT in a high freq transmitter type circuit. Seemed to be a more general purpose- voltage/current amp applications. Lots of TTL logic on these old boards.
     
  10. SgtWookie

    Expert

    Jul 17, 2007
    22,182
    1,728
    You might try writing to ONsemi; that's the discrete component part of what was Motorola.

    What equipment(s) were they removed from? Any date codes on it?

    Posting an image of the equipment ID plate could help.

    Can't be sure of the scale of your images, but are those similar to TO-92 packages?
     
  11. R!f@@

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 2, 2009
    8,741
    759
    Those are NPN and PNP like u said.
    Data reference is MPSA XXXX series
     
  12. Kermit2

    Thread Starter AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 5, 2010
    3,771
    929
    Like the A14's I've got in a big pile here?

    These are not darlingtons, They are a common transistor of some sort, but the number is not an industry standard one.

    If YOU have found a reference I would love to see it. Using your info got me no closer to finding a data sheet than I was before.

    Thanks to everyone who has tried to help. looks like it's ExperiMenT Time! :)
     
  13. R!f@@

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 2, 2009
    8,741
    759
    try MPSA1001
     
  14. themotorman

    Member

    Jun 13, 2009
    13
    0
    Just test them and find out if they transistors. Do a current gain and consider them GP NPN or PNP . Depending on size the current rating would be a guess. If you have a real need to use them up it might be worth while to to a test of voltage max too. You have enough o blow up a few! Many multimeters can check for the DC current gain and also tell you the polarity too.
     
  15. Kermit2

    Thread Starter AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 5, 2010
    3,771
    929
    [​IMG]


    Yes! I have enough of them to waste a few in testing.


    :)
     
  16. SgtWookie

    Expert

    Jul 17, 2007
    22,182
    1,728
    OK, so they look like TO-92 packages.

    Keep in mind that those will be limited to ~625mW power dissipation just by the package design.

    You might consider building a curve tracer. ;) You have an O-scope available already, right?
     
  17. Kermit2

    Thread Starter AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 5, 2010
    3,771
    929
    :)


    The very same 10,000 lb model I used in Navy electronics school by the way. Only the nice leather strap has been replaced by rope and shrink tubing. Not that I ever try to lift it, but should I need to have somebody move it for me, it has a handle. HP used some lead filled transistors or something I guess.

    :)
     
  18. SgtWookie

    Expert

    Jul 17, 2007
    22,182
    1,728
    OK, so you basically need a ramp generator to drive the Y-axis and a method to step the base current. :)
     
Loading...