Motor coil construction help

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by magnetman12003, Nov 21, 2009.

  1. magnetman12003

    Thread Starter Active Member

    May 10, 2008
    31
    0
    Hi All,
    I want to thank those who have helped me out in the past.
    I am presently constructing an experimental motor. The below U tube link will show it and my variable frequency square wave function generator powering it with pulsed 27 volts.

    The coil specs I have used are as follows: 317.5 feet of DUAL twisted AWG 24 gauge cross connect wire wound into a coil. One single wire INSIDE the coil is connected to one single wire OUTSIDE the coil. The other two wires are connected to the function generator. The total resistance through the coil is 16.3 ohms.

    Having stated all the above I wish to construct the same coil and connect it in parallel with the above coil. And have the same motor performance as if I was using the single coil seen in my U tube video.

    But as it is when you connect two coils in parallel the total resistance changes so I figure I would be looking at 8.15 ohms.

    Question: Should that make a different in performance or will I have to experiment more for maximum motor performance? Using math can that be figured out? The single coil shown in the video performs exceptionally well. I would like the same performance using two coils.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dC-FjOQ6tlM&feature=player_embedded#

    Tom
     
  2. Duane P Wetick

    Active Member

    Apr 23, 2009
    408
    19
    If I understand your connections, it looks like you have a current pulse in one direction in one wire and the same pulse in the (adjacent) second wire going in the opposite direction? I`m not sure what causes the rotor to rotate in a particular direction, unless you have made some difference in the flux paths on the rotor itself. What do you want the second coil to accomplish?

    DPW [Spent years making heaters out of op-amps.]
     
    Last edited: Nov 21, 2009
  3. magnetman12003

    Thread Starter Active Member

    May 10, 2008
    31
    0
    I want the coil to do the same thing performance wise as the first coil but hooking them both in parallel to the same power source might present a performance problem.

    Say you wind a coil with two cross connect wires twisted together as I did. A pair of wires. One iis colored red and the other wire is colored green.
    You wind the coil starting from the inside to the outside. Both wires in one wind. Next you take the green inside wire and connect it to the red outside wire. Whats left is a green outside wire and a red inside wire. Both of which connect to the power source. Works super!

    Tom
     
  4. Duane P Wetick

    Active Member

    Apr 23, 2009
    408
    19
    Is the position of the second coil 180 degrees from the first? Why not connect them in series...but watch the polarities such that they add and not fight each other. From your source, + to S grn, F grn to S red, F red to -. Now add the second coil in series with the first.

    Regards, DPW [ Spent years making heaters out of op-amps].
     
  5. magnetman12003

    Thread Starter Active Member

    May 10, 2008
    31
    0
    Actually what I plan to do is mount two rotor magnets like the one you see in my video on a long shaft. One magnets north pole will mount face up and the other magnets north pole will mount face down. I plan to use two of the same coils and power the coils while they are both laying flat on the table while spinning the rotor magnets above them.

    Needless to say while one coils polarity is switched north pole UP the other coils polarity would be switched south pole UP. Looking at one rotor magnet we see the north pole is repelled upwards. Looking at the other magnet we see the the north pole is attracted downwards The end result is a reciprocating magnetic field of sorts. The total area of a single magnet is magnetically covered all the time now.

    Since both coils are laying flat and someone apart there wont be any magnetic interaction between them.

    When you connect two coils in series the internal resistance is doubled ? Now its 32.6 ohms. No matter how I hook up the wires in the single coil shown on U tube I come up with 16.3 ohms. Nothing works making a straight wire run Green out - Green in - Red in - Red out.

    Tom
     
  6. magnetman12003

    Thread Starter Active Member

    May 10, 2008
    31
    0

    Hi,

    I just took your advice and it works. It will look mch like this when finished but will have a lot more torque and speed.
    This U tube link is my very early experiment using a degausing coil.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kvjiOwDBBa0&feature=channel

    Many thanks, Tom
     
    Last edited: Nov 22, 2009
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