Model Railway Control Panel (Newbie)

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by siweckp, Nov 11, 2013.

  1. siweckp

    Thread Starter New Member

    Oct 22, 2013
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    Hi All
    Great Forum.:)
    Can someone help?
    In the attachment you can see the different power supplies for my project.
    To summarize I need the following on/off switches with either an integrated or separate LED (green):
    1. 24VDC (max 5A)
    2. 16VAC (max 3.6A)
    3. 12vDC (max 0.6A)
    4. 5VDC (max 0.6A)

    If the LEDs cannot be integrated is there a special way to wire them up (circuitry) and are there special Mounts?

    Thanks advance for any Support
    web: http://modelrailway.siweckp.com
     
  2. Alec_t

    AAC Fanatic!

    Sep 17, 2013
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    You could wire them like this
     
  3. siweckp

    Thread Starter New Member

    Oct 22, 2013
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    Hi Alec_t
    Thanks for the schematic.
    I'm absolutely useless in wiring things up. :mad: I do have a breadboard to test connections so I would really appreciate it if you could give me a sort of "physical" picture and, if possible, what type of bridge/LEDs (power ratings etc.) I should purchase.

    Thanks
    Peter
    web: modelrailway.siweckp.com
     
  4. Alec_t

    AAC Fanatic!

    Sep 17, 2013
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    Here's an example bridge rectifier, but almost any one with a >50V, > 0.5A rating would do:
    http://uk.mouser.com/ProductDetail/Vishay-Semiconductors/DF01M-E3-45/?qs=sGAEpiMZZMtQ8nqTKtFS%2fMRt2%2f0z7BctJApgXuK0Fhk%3d
    There's a wide choice of green LEDs in various sizes. 3mm would probably suit. Be aware that LEDs must be connected 'right way round'. There is a 'flat' on the base which signifies the cathode. No need for high brightness or anything fancy. Clips for panel-mounting LEDs are available, or you could simply glue them in place in holes in a panel.
    All resistors would be normal 1/4W type, 10% tolerance or better.
    If you want a 'physical picture', just google for images of the components.
     
  5. ErnieM

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 24, 2011
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    You really don't need the bridge rectifier to light LED from AC; a simple single diode will do just fine.

    As long as the LED and the diode "point" the same way it will work. Just about any diode you can find will work. 1N4001 (or 2 or 3 or 4...) is OK, as is a 1N4148...
     
  6. tubeguy

    Well-Known Member

    Nov 3, 2012
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  7. John P

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 14, 2008
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    I think it's actually safer to put the diode in parallel with the LED, but facing the other way. Then reverse current does flow, but the voltage across the LED is limited to 1 diode drop. If you put the 2 diodes in series, you can't be quite sure where the reverse voltage drop will be--if the diode (not the LED) is a little leaky, the reverse voltage would fall on the LED, and their ability to withstand that kind of load is very limited.
     
  8. siweckp

    Thread Starter New Member

    Oct 22, 2013
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    Hi All
    Thanks for your suggestions.
    I'm very much a picture orientated guy. I would really appreciate it if someone cold Show me how to wire-up on a breadboard.
    Thanks in advance
    Peter
     
  9. Alec_t

    AAC Fanatic!

    Sep 17, 2013
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    ..... except that the LED then has a noticeable 50Hz flicker.
    4 LEDs on a breadboard won't be very exciting :D. Surely you will want to build this on Veroboard or similar?
     
  10. tubeguy

    Well-Known Member

    Nov 3, 2012
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    If you want to avoid soldering, you could use euro-style screw terminal strips. Very secure direct wire connections. IMO I wouldn't use breadboards for anything permanent.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Nov 13, 2013
  11. siweckp

    Thread Starter New Member

    Oct 22, 2013
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    Hi tubeguy
    OK, good idea, just Show me how to wire it all up and I'll get on with it.
    Thanks
    Peter
     
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