mixed of f what means in broadband

Discussion in 'Computing and Networks' started by lse123, Apr 25, 2010.

  1. lse123

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Oct 17, 2006
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    In broadband LAN / DSL exist many channels(in FDM many f) , well these channels [f] , does not interfere between each other, so if get mixed there is way to umnmixed? correct?

    mixed of f what means in broadband?
    in any grade, mixed, always there is way get originals signals(unmixed) back?
     
  2. beenthere

    Retired Moderator

    Apr 20, 2004
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    Too many things got mixed up. DSL is a means of sending data on telephone lines by using higher than voice frequencies and filters. LAN uses a different signaling method, although both and telephone signals are carried on UTP cables - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Twisted_pair

    In both cases, data comes and goes in packets. The data packets contain information that allow multiple users to share the same sets of wires. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Packet_(information_technology)

    In broadband, the packets are sent as modulations on a carrier frequency that is broadcast, rather than carried in a cable.

    In all cases, the individual packets may be identified by their headers, irrespective of the transmitting method.
     
  3. lse123

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Oct 17, 2006
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    the individual packets eg packet1=f1, packet2=f2... if mixed they do not destroyed?
    In any mixure there is alway way get original signls back? yes/no
    Finally mixed signals are get, transmitted as one signal come from many signals?
    we do not have contribution in differ signals[fs]?
     
  4. beenthere

    Retired Moderator

    Apr 20, 2004
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    Here is a link to the concept of packets in TCP/IP - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transmission_Control_Protocol

    You will see that internal fields make it possible to see if any data corruption has been experienced. Even though the packets share the same cable or frequency, they are not mixed together, if I understand you properly.
     
  5. AlexR

    Well-Known Member

    Jan 16, 2008
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    The data segment of a DSL link is simply a high speed serial link. As with all serial data links the data (as IP packets in this case) is transmitted sequentially one packet at a time. There is no mixing of data packets during transmission.
     
  6. rjenkins

    AAC Fanatic!

    Nov 6, 2005
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    The DSL/ADSL system is frequency multiplexed.

    The available frequency, from a few KHz above the audio up to somewhere in the 1 to 2 MHz range, is divided into hundreds of slots or channels.

    Each slot is used for a separate data stream, one way or the other.

    The system is adaptive and each slot has the speed adjusted to match the line quality or interference at that particular frequency.

    You can think of it as something like masses of dial-up modems all on separate radio channels, but with the signal down the phone line rather than using antennas.
     
  7. lse123

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Oct 17, 2006
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    In broadband(frequency), why A packet from one frequency(f) can NOT mixed up with another f, I mean go to another frequency way, and get this other street(same cable)?
     
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