Mini Generator

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by Lightfire, Oct 5, 2010.

  1. Lightfire

    Thread Starter Well-Known Member

    Oct 5, 2010
    690
    21
    Hi,

    I would like to ask if I can do that project.

    I am planning to make an "Mini Generator" which the supporting power is from batteries. In Philippines, I think the normal electricity (household) is about 220 to 240 voltage, so maybe I can use 1.5 voltage battery or the 2.5 voltage battery. 240 divided by 1.5 is 160, if 240 divided by 2.5 the result is 96 . So, I might use 96 batteries to fully operate my generator, right?

    So, here we go. Does 96 pieces of 2.5 batteries can operate an appliances which needs 220 to 240 voltage. I think yes, since 96 pieces of 2.5 batteries is equal to 240 (if the battery is connected each other)

    If it can be, how many hours it can operate and how many hours it will recharge again? Please take note that my batteries is not rechargeable batteries.

    May I ask also, if the bulb from the car is about 12 voltage?

    Thank you in advanced.
     
  2. bertus

    Administrator

    Apr 5, 2008
    15,648
    2,347
    Hello,

    Not all appliances will work on DC (what the batteries deliver).
    A light bulb will work, but a television or radio or something with an AC motor in it will not work.

    Bertus
     
  3. Lightfire

    Thread Starter Well-Known Member

    Oct 5, 2010
    690
    21
    A florescent bulb will work (voltage is about 220 to 240)? But, if I will touch the wire (wire of my generator) it might I grounded?

    Thank you.
     
  4. bertus

    Administrator

    Apr 5, 2008
    15,648
    2,347
    Hello,

    A fluorescent light bulb will probably work on AC as there is a ballast in the housing.
    It will probably NOT work on DC from the batteries.

    Does the generator produce AC or DC?
    If it does generate AC it can NOT be connected to the batteries directly.

    Bertus
     
  5. Lightfire

    Thread Starter Well-Known Member

    Oct 5, 2010
    690
    21
    I don't know. The batteries that I am planning to make as a generator is a normal battery only which is have a code phrase like "Double A, Triple A, and so on".
     
  6. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
    20,766
    2,536
    Old WWII submarine circuits used DC florescent lights, but they were highly inefficient since they used resistors (which got very hot) instead of ballasts.

    If light is what your after use LEDs and a few batteries.

    If you need AC, buy an inverter with several deep discharge lead acid batteries (marine, not automotive), it is a lot cheaper than making something from scratch.
     
  7. wayneh

    Expert

    Sep 9, 2010
    12,124
    3,048
    Do you mean that you want to use the batteries to substitute for the generator, when it is idle?
    It depends on the current draw. At no draw, you'll have no trouble hitting whatever voltage you want. But every cell you add will also add resistance, which will translate to lower voltage under load. That resistance will likely prevent you from accomplishing what you want. The total power you can produce will be very limited, unless you also add batteries in parallel.
    If your batteries are not rechargeable, you cannot recharge them. Period.
    Usually, yes.
     
  8. marshallf3

    Well-Known Member

    Jul 26, 2010
    2,358
    201
    Penlight batteries as a supply?

    First of all they really only come as 1.5V

    Secondly, they have a very limited amount of amp-hour capacity, matter of fact it's measured in mAh.

    If you managed to hook 160 of them in series you might be able to run a 240V 100W incandescent light bulb for a few hours maximum.
    If it's something that requires very little current, and can run on DC, then you'll need to know the data on the batteries and the device being driven.

    BTW: Generators create DC electricity from a mechanical input such as a gasoline engine, alternators do the same thing but output AC.
     
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