Microcontroller audio processor

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by knutolai, Nov 22, 2012.

  1. knutolai

    Thread Starter New Member

    Nov 22, 2012
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    Hi and greetings everybody! My first post at last!

    I am studying music technology and will soon begin my bachelor task which spans over half a year. I wish for this this task to delve into microcontroller programming and processing for use with audio. I have joined the site with the hope of finding useful resources getting me going in the right direction with my project.

    My background knowledge:
    Currently I have some limited experience with Arduino which triggered my interest. I have been building and experimenting with analog and CMOS guitar and synth projects for over a year and built myself a basic understanding of both analog and digital electronics. I have programmed music in Csound and Python. I have a firm understanding of the former. Also I have taken a course on digital technology, learning about gates and may useful CMOS ICs.

    I saw this (http://soniccrayon.blogspot.no/2012/08/anti-nautilus-or-autoglitch.html) project and was pleased to see how much it overlaps with fields I have some knowledge in. What I wish to do is along the same lines as the project: Microcontroller-based stompboxes/synth.
    After some research I am under the impression that I need to learn the language C to program the PIC microcontrollers as well as buying a development-module for compiling the code. Are there any more intuitive options to coding the chips in C that I have missed?

    Right now I need to find out which chip type to use Arduino/AVR or PIC. Its the usual dilemma: Price/learning C. I currently own a Arduin Uno, but I believe it is too limited for my purposes. So I need your recommendation forum!
    Would I be able to produce the same results with a Arduino Mega or Arduino Due (the most powerful arduino unit) as I would with a 32-bit PIC chip?
    Are there any limitations with either options I should be aware of?
    Does anyone have any experiences to share?
    Are there any options Im unaware of?
    What has been done? What has not? :)
     
  2. ErnieM

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 24, 2011
    7,386
    1,605
    If you browse Microchip's Audio and Sound pages you should find out what a PIC can do, and some handy dev boards to start with.

    I've never done much with audio off a PIC beyond playing a few simple waveforms so my app can go [SIZE=-1]"zip" when it move[SIZE=-1]s[/SIZE] and "bop" when it stop[SIZE=-1]s[/SIZE] [SIZE=-1]a[/SIZE]nd "whirr" when it st[SIZE=-1]ands[/SIZE] still. [/SIZE]
     
  3. knutolai

    Thread Starter New Member

    Nov 22, 2012
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    0
    Thanks for the resource. This is really helpful. I noticed that some PICs come with USB support and some don't, also there is USB OTG. I was unable to find a clear answer on what benefits this gives. I'm guessing this will make programming the chip easier?
     
  4. ErnieM

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 24, 2011
    7,386
    1,605
    The programming (and in-circuit debugging while the physical device is running code) is done via the In Circuit Serial Programming (ICSP) interface, 3 pins about the chip common to most every PIC. They can be re purposed for other functions once the device is programmed.

    The USB support is so the PIC can appear to a PC or other similar device as a peripheral such as a mouse or a flash drive or the like. It has nothing to do with programming (excepting applications where the USB can be used to re-flash a device in the field).

    USB OTG means the device may be a master in some cases so two devices may communicate directly without a PC.
     
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