micro controller

Discussion in 'Programmer's Corner' started by usamaabdelatty80, Oct 21, 2012.

  1. usamaabdelatty80

    Thread Starter New Member

    Oct 21, 2012
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    i have micro controller Motorola MC68331CFC16 on double face board and i want to read the program on the micro controller.
    need your help.
     
  2. olphart

    New Member

    Sep 22, 2012
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    Howdy, too bad you want that. Motorola (Freescale now) DELIBERATELY makes it nigh onto Impossible for you to take someone elses' IP. Being a coder I applaud their efforts. You'll have to find another way.

    Also, even a raw disassembly of the code would be Extremely Difficult to trace, let alone modify/document/understand. Especially if compiled from C. BTDT... shot down in flames <<<)))

    P.S. rule of reverse engineering: by the time you've reversed someone elses' work/IP, you've built it yourself at least 2-3 times (unless you just don't know how).
     
    Last edited: Oct 22, 2012
  3. kubeek

    AAC Fanatic!

    Sep 20, 2005
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    When you simply want to copy the thing instead of reverse engineering it it gets much easier than that.
    Thankfully all programmable chip manufacturers have ways of locking the contents, and unless the manufacturer of the thing you want to copy is stupid enough to leave the protection open you stand no chance.

    There may be other ways of getting the code, but it sill is cheaper and faster to write it again than to try to hack the thing. I mean you could theoretically decap the IC and find where the fuse is and somehow change it, but that is a whole lot harder than rewriting the code from scratch. Or you could spend years with differential power analysis and get some portions of the code out.
     
  4. Papabravo

    Expert

    Feb 24, 2006
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    Depending on the amount of time and money you have to expend you have some chances to defeat the built in security. They involve dissolving the package with toxic chemicals, using an optical microscope, and microprobing the actual chip. Only a well funded company or government could afford this level of effort.

    http://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/~sps32/mcu_lock.html

    A starting budget for the effort might run say half a million USD. You got that kind of scratch?
     
  5. t06afre

    AAC Fanatic!

    May 11, 2009
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    Some firms in China does it much much cheaper than that.
     
  6. Papabravo

    Expert

    Feb 24, 2006
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    That's if you want to stuff cash in envelopes and trust them to do what you want them to do.
     
  7. usamaabdelatty80

    Thread Starter New Member

    Oct 21, 2012
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    really , I need to copy the application from microcoller in the PCB to another Microcontroller in another PCB board.
     
  8. spinnaker

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 29, 2009
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    Do you really thing anyone here is going to help you violate copy protection laws????
     
  9. t06afre

    AAC Fanatic!

    May 11, 2009
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    This is quite simple. The code in your chip may be protected. Which mean the code stays in the chip and can not be read by a programmer. This will be most likely for any commercial product. Or the code in the chip is not code protected. And you may be able to read the code out from the chip with some adequate tool. You can not tell this by looking at the chip. You have to try it out. If the content of the chip is protected. Well bad luck for you
     
  10. Papabravo

    Expert

    Feb 24, 2006
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    I gave him the link to some relevant research. I doubt the OP has either the motivation or the resources to execute that plan. In which case I agrre with the out of luck opinion.

    @spinaker - I'm not aware of any case law on the breaking of security measures in a chip. This is especially true if the product is no longer being manufactured and the parts are pure unobtanium. Perhaps you could cite a relevant example. I think a "fair use" argument could be made if you want to make one copy to put on a board you already have.
     
    Last edited: Oct 27, 2012
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