measuring ttl frequency (beginner)

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by danilo mello, Sep 10, 2012.

  1. danilo mello

    Thread Starter New Member

    Sep 10, 2012
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    Hello

    My problem is : i need to build something that reads a TTL signal and write the average frequency to a serial port every specific time. Simples as that. (frequency of about 500kHz and sampling every 0,1s)

    I was using an arduino board to do the job, but it is not working quite well, so, i started looking for more specific hardware to help me do the job, like counters, flip-flops, etc etc.

    Some people say that i should learn assembly to help me with this, others say that i must learn PIC, others suggest me buying this, that, etc etc.

    well. can someone point me a path i should follow? im tipically self taught, so, i just need a tip to know where should i look for to solve my problem.

    Thanks.
     
  2. Dodgydave

    AAC Fanatic!

    Jun 22, 2012
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    Last edited: Sep 10, 2012
  3. Papabravo

    Expert

    Feb 24, 2006
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    You can actually do it with anything, but there are limitations with every solution. The instrument you want is called a frequency counter. When trying to build something it helps to have something to compare your results to. If you can find a build it yourself kit that would be a good place to start.
     
  4. ErnieM

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 24, 2011
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    Way cheaper then a frequency counter is a frequency generator. You can buy a complete TTL output oscillator for a few dollars, and they are incredibly accurate.

    Having a known source will let you compare what your circuit is doing.

    While I have never worked with an Arduino I would be very surprised if it was not capable of doing this task.
     
  5. MrChips

    Moderator

    Oct 2, 2009
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    Here are three ways to build a frequency counter


    1. Build from TTL or CMOS counters and gates.
    2. Use a single chip frequency counter such as ICM7208 (if you can find one)
    3. Use a microcontroller
     
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