measuring dc voltage in a unique way!

Discussion in 'Embedded Systems and Microcontrollers' started by poison3000, Oct 3, 2010.

  1. poison3000

    Thread Starter New Member

    Oct 3, 2010
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    hello people ...


    u probably saw and used a Digital voltmeter (or multimeter ) .. and when u choose the a node to measure its voltage u can read it clearly on small LCD screen ...

    well , is it possible to have a circuit where some sort of a chip that u connect it across any component on the circuit ( say a resistor ) and that chip will start streaming bits that is linear to the dc voltage across that component ?

    my idea is to have two separate dc voltages outputted from two different chip , then a magical chip or circuit will read theses dc voltage output and intrepret it some binary value , then binary values taken to digital comparator and decides which dc voltage value is bigger in magnitude ...

    so , is there a way to build or find such chip ? what is it called ?

    please help :confused:
     
  2. beenthere

    Retired Moderator

    Apr 20, 2004
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    That task can be done by any number of microprocessors. They must be able to input at least two separate sources to the A to D converter. There must be some means to insure the measured voltages are within the limits of the device.

    After conversion, the larger voltage will have a larger numeric value.
     
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  3. poison3000

    Thread Starter New Member

    Oct 3, 2010
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    hmmm ... can u , please , show me a reference to read ?
     
  4. beenthere

    Retired Moderator

    Apr 20, 2004
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    poison3000 likes this.
  5. poison3000

    Thread Starter New Member

    Oct 3, 2010
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    so basically i can deal with dc voltage as analog signal and use Analog-to-Digital Converter ? after all, dc voltage is continuous-time and continuous-amplitude , but with zero frequency .. right ?
     
  6. beenthere

    Retired Moderator

    Apr 20, 2004
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    It can be, but a DC signal can vary with time at any frequency. The thing that makes it DC is that the signal voltage is always one polarity - either positive or negative. A signal becomes AC if it crosses the zero voltage line.
     
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  7. poison3000

    Thread Starter New Member

    Oct 3, 2010
    22
    0
    thank u very much .. u saved my day !!!
     
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