Meaning of test meter values

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by Gdrumm, Aug 22, 2014.

  1. Gdrumm

    Thread Starter Distinguished Member

    Aug 29, 2008
    684
    36
    Here is a small meter I bought on Ebay.

    I hope the text document is readable.
    I couldn't attach Execl, Word, or .RTF, so I used Notepad.

    Code ( (Unknown Language)):
    1.  
    2. Type          "Marked Farads"   "Marked Volts"  "Read Farads"   "Read ESR Value" "Read V Loss"
    3. Electro        270uF                 250 V           258.9 uF        .13 Ohms          0.7%
    4. Electro        270uF                 250 V           255.7 uF        .14 Ohms          0.9%
    5. Electro         270uF                250 V           261.0 uF       .13 Ohms           None shown
    6. Varistor        145471K 737+                           368pF            18 Ohms         None shown
    7. Electro        220uF                 80v               221.6 uF      .10 Ohms          0.8%
    8. Electro        220uF                 80v               223.6 uF      .08 Ohm            None shown
    9. Ceramic?       683J1000 NISV93                        68.1 nF         18 Ohms           None shown
    10.  

    Can you tell by what I've posted whether any of these capacitors are "good" or "bad"?

    Also, what does Vloss indicate?

    I read a little bit on the Internet, but it wasn't clear.

    Thanks,
    Gary
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 23, 2014
  2. crutschow

    Expert

    Mar 14, 2008
    12,988
    3,226
    I believe all the capacitors look okay. The ESR of the ceramic cap looks a little high but could be normal. Don't have enough info about the varistor to know if those values are correct as it's a non-linear resistor, not a capacitor.

    Vloss is apparently a measure of the capacitor dissipation factor.
     
  3. Gdrumm

    Thread Starter Distinguished Member

    Aug 29, 2008
    684
    36
    Thanks crutschow,
    Gary
     
  4. JMW

    Member

    Nov 21, 2011
    88
    8
    Did you have the meter calibrated? I have found the extra charge is money well spent. Then i measure a couple of resistors and set them aside. With an assortment of resistors of various known values, checking the calibration is easy.
     
  5. Gdrumm

    Thread Starter Distinguished Member

    Aug 29, 2008
    684
    36
    Good point.
    I have a good digital multimeter that will check capacitance, and I can use that to validate what I'm seeing on the small Chinese meter.
    Thanks
     
    Last edited: Aug 25, 2014
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