maxwells theory of electromagnetics

Discussion in 'Physics' started by sachin.tiger, Sep 24, 2010.

  1. sachin.tiger

    Thread Starter New Member

    Sep 24, 2010
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    hey can somebody tell me where i can find some theory ,maxwells theory of electromagnetism i really can not find it anywhere.
     
  2. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
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  3. Ghar

    Active Member

    Mar 8, 2010
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  4. sachin.tiger

    Thread Starter New Member

    Sep 24, 2010
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    i am still not able to find it .HELP REQUIRED
     
  5. beenthere

    Retired Moderator

    Apr 20, 2004
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    Are you not able to use the links provided? They seem to work.

    Give us some help - what is "it", and what help do you feel you require?
     
  6. lmartinez

    Active Member

    Mar 8, 2009
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  7. sachin.tiger

    Thread Starter New Member

    Sep 24, 2010
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    I need some real explanation on maxwell's theory of electromagnetism, although the links gave me some help but i am still not satisfied . if any one knows of any good link or a book on the theory plz send it to me
     
  8. steveb

    Senior Member

    Jul 3, 2008
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    Have you checked out the MIT video lectures? This is a freshman level course on EM field theory. Being an MIT course, it's not watered down too much, but at the freshman level the Prof takes it a little easy by not going into the full blown vector calculus formalism. I think this is a good place to start.

    http://ocw.mit.edu/courses/physics/8-02-electricity-and-magnetism-spring-2002/video-lectures/

    As far as books, there are a number of texts to be found at Amazon. My old undergraduate text was by Krauss, which is still available in newer editions. I have not seen the new edition, but I know the old ones were good. I noticed on amazon some used old editions that cost < $5.00. Can't hurt to try that!
     
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  9. David P. Stern

    New Member

    Sep 30, 2010
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    Maxwell's equations relate the electric field E and magnetic field B (both 3D vectors) to their sources--charges and currents, including secondary ones created in materials.
    They are differential equations which can be expressed in derivatives or with differential operators of geometric significance.
    If you can hack the math, look up textbooks.

    If not, look up
    http://www.phy6.org/Electric/Eintro.htm
    section before the last (I wrote it, you may ask me more afterwards)

    David
     
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