Max power Of amplifier

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by justin77, Apr 12, 2010.

  1. justin77

    Thread Starter New Member

    Apr 3, 2010
    19
    0
    Maximum output voltage that a amplifier can achieve would be equal to the input voltage. But still i don't think that an amplifier can come into that state. So Now if the input voltage is V then the theoretical maximum power that an amplifier can go is


    V^2 / R where R is the speaker impedance

    Now if an amplifier is said to produce 2000Watt's, 1000Watt's per channel, at 48V AC then its overstated power am i correct.
     
  2. justin77

    Thread Starter New Member

    Apr 3, 2010
    19
    0
    Provided that it does not have a voltage step up switching circuit
     
  3. SgtWookie

    Expert

    Jul 17, 2007
    22,182
    1,728
    A bridge amplifier can effectively double the supply voltage.

    If the net total impedance of each speaker was 2 Ohms, then it could be do-able.
     
  4. Jazz Bass Special

    New Member

    Apr 9, 2010
    24
    5
    Crown has been using a "grounded bridge" power supply for years.
    It effectively doubles the available voltage from the mains.
    If you are interested, read this paper from Crown to understand the concept.
    Link:http://www.crownaudio.com/pdf/amps/grbgpapr.pdf
     
Loading...