Math Softwares, your preference?

Discussion in 'Math' started by ELECTRONERD, Oct 14, 2009.

Based upon the following math softwares, which one would you consider the "best"?

Poll closed Nov 13, 2009.
  1. Maxima

    50.0%
  2. Scilab

    16.7%
  3. Octave

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  4. Freemat

    16.7%
  5. R

    16.7%
  1. ELECTRONERD

    Thread Starter Senior Member

    May 26, 2009
    1,146
    16
    Hey Everyone,

    I need a math software and I'm wondering what's the best one you could possibly suggest? "Best" to me includes facets such as the most technical, good graphical representations of problems, and capable of virtually all types of math problems.

    • Maxima
    • Scilab
    • Octave
    • Freemat
    • R
    I'd like to have your own opinion on each of them, or the one you use, and why.
     
  2. Dave

    Retired Moderator

    Nov 17, 2003
    6,960
    144
    I take it one of the criteria is that it is free, hence the obvious omission of Matlab?

    Either way, I've had a good experience with both Octave and Freemat (used as a Matlab alternative), but Freemat is that little bit more polished IMO...so Freemat.

    Dave
     
  3. Thav

    Member

    Oct 13, 2009
    82
    0
    I voted Maxima here, because I use that for any laplace or complex algebraic work.

    I use Scilab when I'm doing linear algebra or dealing with data sets.
     
  4. Papabravo

    Expert

    Feb 24, 2006
    10,135
    1,786
    It is really hard to beat `R' for any kind of statistical work or data reduction. The built in functions for the normal and students-t distribution are invaluable.

    I also like Scilab for its programming and plotting capabilities
     
  5. ELECTRONERD

    Thread Starter Senior Member

    May 26, 2009
    1,146
    16
    Thanks for all the replies everyone!

    Well, I'm currently in Algebra I for math as a student, what would you guys recommend for someone like that? I don't only do Algebra though, I experiment with antennas so plotting and graphs is always nice. I'm also hoping to learn some new math from one of these softwares.
     
    Last edited: Oct 15, 2009
  6. someonesdad

    Senior Member

    Jul 7, 2009
    1,585
    141
    I'm in the process of writing a short white paper on why I think engineers and scientists ought to take a look at python and some of its add-on libraries. python is a great glue language and a powerful general-purpose programming tool in its own right -- with a huge standard library. There are thousands of solutions on the web, meaning there's a pretty good chance someone has already worked on the problem you're interested in.

    My favorite python add-on is numpy, an array processing tool. Lots of good capabilities and it's fast (core code is in C). matplotlib is good for presentation-quality plots and sympy can be used to do symbolic calculations (sympy can also do 3D plots with OpenGL rendering so that you can move the plot around and rotate it to see it from all sides). One of my examples does an indefinite integral with sympy, then dynamically compiles the resulting formula into python (along with a series approximation) and executes them with a numpy array and plots the result. All in around 20 lines of code. I'll post the white paper here when I get it finished.
     
  7. count_volta

    Active Member

    Feb 4, 2009
    435
    24
    Maple? Matlab? Too advanced for basic algebra though.
     
  8. RolfRomeo

    Member

    Apr 27, 2009
    17
    0
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