Mars

Discussion in 'General Science' started by loosewire, Jul 15, 2009.

  1. loosewire

    Thread Starter AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 25, 2008
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    How many day' s will It take a plasmas rocket to reach Mars?
     
    Last edited: Jul 15, 2009
  2. jpanhalt

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    Did we watch the same Nova show last night?

    If so, what was used in olden times as a teeth whitener?

    John
     
  3. steveb

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    Jul 3, 2008
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    It takes between 12 and 13 days. If you disagree, it's because you are not familiar with my new plasma rocket design which employs a Stanley Miyers V1C. What? You don't understand? I guess you don't have an open mind. ;)

    OK, the real answer is about 40 days. Sounds like a biblical trip to me.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 24, 2009
  4. loosewire

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    Very close,who is the Inventor,nasa?
     
  5. jpanhalt

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    The time reported on Nova was closer to 45 days, as I recall. It was not a number I paid much attention to, but it was a serious estimate.

    John

    Oops: Sorry steveb, I missed your real answer.
     
  6. loosewire

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    Did nasa Invent the rocket? Was it the guy that disapeared in the rockies after
    breaking all the records around the world Fose.
     
    Last edited: Jul 15, 2009
  7. jpanhalt

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    I don't think so. "Plasma rockets" have been talked about for a long time, even going back to before nuclear rockets.

    The astronaut/physicist on the show last night was Dr. Franklin Chang-Diaz from Costa Rica and USA (MIT). He gave his calculation and has laboratories in both countries looking at the project. He has a prototype scheduled for a test in space.

    John
     
  8. loosewire

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    If the membership has no knowledge,I will have to go to google.
    Which came first aac or google,or am I waiting for someone to come back from google. Thanks
     
    Last edited: Jul 15, 2009
  9. loosewire

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    He tied the the number of space flight's @ 13.Exlpain the temperature ranges for both type
    engine's? Jump in guys ,loosewire can't carry a conservation. It seem Plasma he should not know the
    word or temp. Southern boys should keep there place,no opinion,no public speaking and not
    holding any positions.Not know to how ride a horse,no less own a horse.That mid west and west.
    And least be a communicator among holders of high position's.
     
    Last edited: Jul 15, 2009
  10. rin-elt

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    Jun 18, 2009
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    i don't understand what is really your question!
     
  11. Wendy

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    Mar 24, 2008
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    Sounds like I missed a good show. Plasma rocket = ion engine?
     
  12. jpanhalt

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    Bill,
    The actual name of the series on PBS is "Nova scienceNow" (notice the odd capitalization).

    The listing for this particular episode read in part, "Drugs that may aid children with muscular dystrophy; the northern lights. Also: paleontologist..."

    It is being re-run several times today and tomorrow in the Cleveland area. So, I suspect Texas stations are carrying it too. It has a lot of glitz, but is still better than the alternatives. Unless, of course, SmackDown, Wife Swap, or Survivor-Obama are on. :D

    John
     
  13. loosewire

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    What are the temperature range's of plamas gas and mile's per minute in space.
    Engine it's only in the testing stage.
     
  14. Wendy

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    I don't think mile's per minute is a valid measurement. Think Neutons, or units of weight (mass?) of thrust. If it is an ion engine it will be huge, since it is basically an electric device. Fuel mass is more than valuable, it determines what a rocket engine can do.
     
  15. Mark44

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    Nov 26, 2007
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    After Sir Isaac Neuton? :eek: Or maybe fig Neutons? Not to be confused with the nuclear particle with no change, the newtron.
     
  16. Wendy

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    My model rocket handbook called it Neutons, so there! :D
     
  17. Mark44

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    Well, if it's printed on paper, we know it has to be correct!:D
     
  18. RiJoRI

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    Aug 15, 2007
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    Depends on the acceleration. R.A. Heinlein worked it out long before PCs. If I recollect correct, it would take 7 days with constant acceleration at 1g.

    The motive force is, basically immaterial. Plasma rocket, ion rocket, chemical rocket, or Scotty spitting out the back, it doesn't matter, as long as the Δv is 1g.

    --Rich
     
  19. Wendy

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    I think your numbers are a bit off, 1G is a heck of a lot of acceleration. I remember seeing a chart many tens of orbits ago that went through that. However, since 1G is 32ft/sec², it is easy nuff to calculate if you know calculus. I used to know it, but it has been too long. Figure 3½ days at 1G, to accelerate, and the same to decelerate, and look at the distance. Of course, this is a major oversimplification since we're talking orbital mechanics, but it gets the idea across. An ion engine would be doing excellent to produce 0.001G of acceleration (and that number is high). However, any acceleration that is continuous and of long duration adds up fast.
     
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