Manufacturing Prefixes (Nomenclature)

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by Šamaš-šum-ûkīn, Oct 16, 2014.

  1. Šamaš-šum-ûkīn

    Thread Starter New Member

    Oct 10, 2014
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    Hi,

    albeit definitely not critical, I was wondering about a specific convention from one Analog Devices chip (ADN8831; thermoelectric cooler controller). While I know the prefixes generally stand for the manufacturer (AD: Analog Devices), Analog Devices added a third prefix letter for several of their products. I've read somewhere it notifies specific functions or product families, but I've found no such list anywhere. The closest guess I've made is "N" stands for NTC (Negative Temperature Coefficient).
    In regards to the bunch of serial numbers, as usual, I discard that because it is utterly rare to find any reference (clear ordering guides) about that. I suppose they are simply version numbers (especially the two first numbers like 4000 family for the CMOS one).

    Regards

    P.S. I've found this from a former ordering guide, but I suppose it is before the inclusion of a third letter.
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Oct 16, 2014
  2. mcgyvr

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 15, 2009
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    If you want to know why a manufacture has chosen a specific naming convention you would typically contact them..
     
  3. Šamaš-šum-ûkīn

    Thread Starter New Member

    Oct 10, 2014
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    If I get no answer by the end of the day, I'll follow your advice. Since I've already "harassed" some Egyptologists for my secondary hobby, why not the same from manufacturers, especially knowing they are ready to serve potential clients.
     
    Last edited: Oct 16, 2014
  4. mcgyvr

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 15, 2009
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    It usually never hurts to ask.. But don't always expect an answer..

    I know that many companies have been adding an extra number or letter to indicate ROHS (lead free) compliance.
     
  5. bertus

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  6. Papabravo

    Expert

    Feb 24, 2006
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    When it comes to naming and labeling there are no standards. Any company that makes a new part can label it any way they want to. Companies that want to be a "second" source for a popular part will often adopt the original manufacturer's nomenclature with subtle variations. There is absolutely no requirement for any of the letters or numbers to have any relationship to the manufacturer. In the early days of integrated circuits, National Semiconductor use LM for "Linear Monolithic", and DM for "Digital Monolithic". I'm not sure I ever saw a part from them labeled NS.
     
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  7. #12

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    100% with Papabravo. Nearly 50 years doing this and I can name less than a hand full of devices that start with the initials of their manufacturer. NE or SE= Signetics LM = National LS7210 that I bought at Radio Shack= not a clue. CD= never did find out! You just learn them as you go.
     
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  8. Papabravo

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    Feb 24, 2006
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    From the Wikipedia article:

    "The naming system followed the RCA convention of CA for analog, CD for digital, but did not relate to the Texas Instruments SN7400 series numbering scheme."
     
    Šamaš-šum-ûkīn likes this.
  9. alfacliff

    Well-Known Member

    Dec 13, 2013
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    if the manufacturers actually labeled things properly, they could be fixed instead of forcing you to send them in for repair or throwing things away and buying another. labeled parts were the reason things got fixed more in the oloder days.
     
  10. Šamaš-šum-ûkīn

    Thread Starter New Member

    Oct 10, 2014
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    Can you elaborate on this? I am unsure what do you mean by that? (I just entered the realms of electronics).

    ========================================
    On a side to note to everyone, I have just sent a message to a technician of Analog Devices. Once I get the reply (and the info if there's any), I will deliver the pertinent info here.
     
  11. Papabravo

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    I don't think this has much to do with it at all. In the days of vacuum tube television, minimum wage was $1.25, now it is headed for $10.10. In a chassis with point to point wiring you could actually trace out a schematic. With a multilayer board this is now nearly impossible. One more thing: what is the proper labeling for a custom chip that you develop, make 10,000 of, and throw away the mask? There are good reasons why some chips are no longer being produced and are unavailable.
     
  12. alfacliff

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    Dec 13, 2013
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    repairing stuff without schematics is my specialty. I have to because manufacturers dont want to give out any info to outsiders. I work on stuff from tubes to multilayer surface mount boards, and have for years. I know theres not much room on some smd to put part numbers, but searching for something that matches, then folowing the circuit to see if its right does get old.
     
  13. #12

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    If you think trying to convert an LM number to a National Semiconductor part was difficult, wait until you try to convert a PIC number to a working part that you can buy. :D

    Need a bidirectional driver that switches every 4/10ths of a second? Do not use an LM555. It's too easy to repair. Use a PIC and sell the customer the whole circuit board for $280 to fix a $400 clothes washer. :)
     
  14. Papabravo

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    What will you do as people become increasingly unwilling to pay your asking price? That day is coming weather you realize it or not.
     
  15. alfacliff

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    at the moment, I dont work for people, I work for a major corporation keeping their manufacturing equipment running.
     
  16. kubeek

    AAC Fanatic!

    Sep 20, 2005
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    The price of the original equipment is of course very low and competitive.
    The price of spare parts encourages people to rather buy a new machine than to try to find someone who is willing and able to repair it, and even if the price will be higher than a new one.
     
  17. Papabravo

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    OK, what will you do when the major corporation, made up of people who make business decisions, decides it can no longer sustain your salary? I hope you manage to see it coming before it flattens you.
     
  18. alfacliff

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    fortunatly, I can still keep ahead of the costs with the value of the repairs. retirement looms tho. sometimes its nice to be an old fart. I just wish I could show someone else what to do and what I've learned over many years before I go. a lot I've learned isnt taught any more.
     
  19. Šamaš-šum-ûkīn

    Thread Starter New Member

    Oct 10, 2014
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    If this is still of interest, a technical support staff from Analog Devices replied to me and gave me the most updated "Ordering Guide" in pdf format. While it doesn't explain all, it gives some insights. ADN stood for Analog Devices Networks (fiber optics networks).
     
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