Making output voltage same as input voltage for CD4060B counter.

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by Fuji, Jan 14, 2015.

  1. Fuji

    Thread Starter Member

    Nov 8, 2014
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    I am wondering if it is possible to make the output voltage from Q4 to Q14 the same as the input voltage of the 4060B??
     
  2. Brevor

    Active Member

    Apr 9, 2011
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    I believe it should be the same as long as your supply voltage is the same as the input voltage, which is the way it's supposed to work. Of course you need to stay within the maximum ratings of the IC..
     
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  3. crutschow

    Expert

    Mar 14, 2008
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    Yes. Just make the power supply voltage for the 4060B the same as the input voltage.
     
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  4. WBahn

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    Mar 31, 2012
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    Yes. If you make the input voltage LO and assert the reset signal, that should make all of the Q outputs LO.

    If you have something else in mind, please be more specific.
     
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  5. Fuji

    Thread Starter Member

    Nov 8, 2014
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    I've placed a crystal on pin 10 and pin 11 for time accuracy.

    Pin 12 (reset) is on ground as well as Pin 8.

    You mean LO as the pin L0? I have P0 pin, I'll assume its the same thing? My main voltage is at Pin 16 VDD. Do I need to switch from Pin 16 to P0 as the input voltage? I already tried this, and the LED stopped oscillating, rather it was just on completely.
     
    Last edited: Jan 14, 2015
  6. WBahn

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    I mean LO and is NOT HI. Your inputs are either LO or HI and your outputs are either LO or HI.

    What, exactly, are you referring to when you say "input voltage"? You are "powering" the chip by connecting it to a suitable power supply between Pin 16 (Vdd) and Pin 8 (Vss). If these are connected then the thing won't work. An "input voltage" generally refers to an input signal.

    What is it, exactly, you are wanting to see?
     
  7. Fuji

    Thread Starter Member

    Nov 8, 2014
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    Currently the 4060B is running on 2v (VDD). I want the outputs from Q4 to Q14 to have the same voltage (2v) going out as the same voltage (2v) coming in to the 4060B.
     
  8. WBahn

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  9. Fuji

    Thread Starter Member

    Nov 8, 2014
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    CD4060BN.

    Well its working in front of me right now... its running on 2V. Could that be a factory error or something? Or am I just lucky? lol :D

    Hey why not? Maybe all the datasheets for this IC was wrong for the voltage after all these years. 2V IT IS! :D
     
    Last edited: Jan 14, 2015
  10. WBahn

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    Mar 31, 2012
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    Who is the manufacturer?

    If the outputs aren't getting close to the supply rails, then that would argue that it ISN'T running on 2V. Unless the part is spec'ed to run at 2V, then you can't count on it running at 2V. It might work today, but tomorrow the room is a bit warmer or colder and it won't work. Or you plug in another chip and it won't work. Or you change something slightly regarding what is hooked up to and it won't work?

    What are you trying to do with the outputs? What are they hooked up to?
     
  11. Fuji

    Thread Starter Member

    Nov 8, 2014
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    I'll check out the manufacture right now.

    You are correct on where the 4060 will not run at 2v. I noticed that sometimes it will run, and sometimes it wont. However, I increased the voltage to 2.2v and I noticed it turns on every time I turn the power on. Im using a buck boost that turns on the 4060BN. You don't think the inductor from the buck boost is helping out a little?

    The outputs are hooked up to resistors then LED's to see the flashings. That is all. With the 4060B is the crystal circuit.

    I have another batch of 30 HCF4060B's coming by, I'll see if they do the same thing and run at 2v or 2.2v
     
    Last edited: Jan 14, 2015
  12. crutschow

    Expert

    Mar 14, 2008
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    A particular chip will likely operate at below its rated voltage but not necessarily over the complete temperature range and will likely not meet the other published specifications, such a speed. A chip doesn't necessarily suddenly stop operating when operated outside its limits.

    For reliable operation you should never operate a chip either above or below its rated voltage limits.
     
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  13. Fuji

    Thread Starter Member

    Nov 8, 2014
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    It says in the datasheet that the 'Recommended
    Thanks for the input. That is a straightforward answer.

    Id like to point out that this 4060B I am using is a CMOS version. I assume this is why the lower voltages seem to be working. It says in the datasheet that the recommended supply voltage for nominal operating conditions is 3V. I'll just use a resistor to lower that voltage back down to 2V later on.

    I raised the voltage to 5v so we dont get off topic. I want to know how to make the output voltages the same as 5v coming into the 4060B.
     
    Last edited: Jan 14, 2015
  14. Brevor

    Active Member

    Apr 9, 2011
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    The specs say with a 5 Volt supply the outputs can only source less than 1 ma. (even less at 2 Volts) If you are driving LED's through low value resistors the output won't be able to go to the full voltage.
     
  15. Fuji

    Thread Starter Member

    Nov 8, 2014
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    I just read that the counter alone can regulate the output voltage without the resistors and I can just keep the LEDs there alone. I'd like a second opinion to this. What do you think?
     
  16. Brevor

    Active Member

    Apr 9, 2011
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    I don't know I have never done that. With voltage that low there is not much current (power) to dissipate, are you using red LED's ? at 2 Volts thats about all you will be able to drive. The output voltage will be clamped at the Vf of the LED.
     
  17. Fuji

    Thread Starter Member

    Nov 8, 2014
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    Yes 3 red LED's. I need to find a way to increase the current externally if thats the case. I dont want to get off topic here, this might be another thread, but I need at least 3mA or 4mA of current on the output frequencies. Basically the LED's are just indicators of the frequencies, then I have the output frequencies going past the LED's with wires. I am not aware yet if 4060B outputs square waves which is what I want from all the outputs at 99% duty cycle and positive offset with no negative spikes.
     
  18. crutschow

    Expert

    Mar 14, 2008
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    You can use a transistor output buffer to increase the current sufficiently to drive the LEDs.
     
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  19. WBahn

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    Mar 31, 2012
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    You need to start looking at the data sheets for the parts you are using. Even when operated at 15V the CD4060BC (I don't know the differences with the BN, possibly none as) is only spec'ed to be able to provide about 3.5 mA of current (though the typical is closer to 9 mA) and most LEDs want more than that. Also, that spec is if only one output is being asked to supply that much current. At 5V the spec'ed output capability for a HI output is less than 1 mA. Also, even if you get the output voltage to 2V, most LEDs need more than that before they will start emitting.

    What type of LED do you have? What is the forward voltage and current spec for it? What size resistor are you using?
     
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  20. WBahn

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    You read that where?
     
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