Making a simple beep circuit!

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by steve10, Apr 28, 2008.

  1. steve10

    steve10 Thread Starter New Member

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    I am using this as a template: http://www.allaboutcircuits.com/vol_6/chpt_5/18.html
    I am trying to make a simple circuit, that beeps (like a beep from a microwave oven.) I am correct using this circuit, and replacing the audio detector with a button.( to make the desired beep )
    Also Replacing the led light with a speaker.
    Please let me know if this sounds correct.

    Thanks, Steve
  2. Audioguru

    Audioguru New Member

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    A speaker draws a high current. The circuit is designed to drive an LED with a low current.

    Why not replace the entire circuit with a piezo beeper that has its own built-in oscillator. Apply a supply voltage from 3V to 12V at low current and it beeps.
  3. Bill_Marsden

    Bill_Marsden Moderator Staff Member

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    Do you want a simple beep with a button press? This circuit was meant to give you probe to show it switching, which was the purpose of the LED/transistor. There are literally hundreds (thousands?) of ways to do this. Ham radio types like to do something similar to practice morse with a key, for example.

    Is it the fact the breadboard is spelled out so completely or what? Or are you curious about the circuit itself?

    I ask this not to criticize, but so I can help. Guru is right, you can buy sonalerts and other piezeo oscillators premade, although I personally hate their pitch (a lot, way too high for my tastes).

    The experiment page is a good place to start, it focuses you towards a definate design. A slight modification of the circuit will drive the speaker by itself, if that is what you want. When it comes to audio oscillators I tend towards the 555 or 556 integrated circuits though, a lot fewer parts and more predictable, not to mention cheap,
  4. steve10

    steve10 Thread Starter New Member

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    Thank you, for the reply.

    Yes. I am looking to produce a device, that will make the desired sound. The more basic, and simple that it is, the better. I do not care what it is made from, as long as it is small.
    Again, the desired sound that I am looking for, is much like the sound, that comes from a microwave touch pad.
    I want to just loop it through a push button, to crate the quick beep tone. This is just for recreational purposes.

    Thanks again,
    Steve
  5. Bill_Marsden

    Bill_Marsden Moderator Staff Member

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    Here are some other ways of doing it. If you still want to built the classic astable you pointed out let me know. The pots maximum value sets the low frequency, you should be able to adjust it to whatever note you want. Use the power supply for the 1st circuit to turn it on/off, the third schematic shows a way of digitally turning the oscillator on/off, as well as a major power boost if the first circuit is too quiet, while the second circuit shows a more conservitive way of boosting power (you will need a power transistor and a possibly a heatsink). 555 ICs are not meant for high power, but they are cheap and available almost anywhere parts are sold. You could even experiment and eliminate the 100 uF capacitor on the 1st circuit, if the speaker can take the DC then it will work OK.

    The values are not critical. A 100K 10 turn pot and a .1uF cap for R and C will give you a minimum frequency of 70 hertz, which isn't quite sub audio but close. The capacitor on pin 5 isn't necessary, but will prevent glitches for more precision applications. If the battery is far away then you might want to put a filter cap on the power supply. The basic circuit is also very forgiving on the power supply voltages (5-15V), a 9 volt battery will work well.

    [​IMG]

    Like I said earlier, there are lots of ways of doing this, transistors are a good beginning.
  6. zx16v

    zx16v New Member

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    hello,i dont know much in electronics..but i mange to build a 555 circuit with buzzer that makes beep beep beep sound,this is nice...but what i need is that when the circuit will get 12v it will make ONLY 3 beeps and stop untill the next time the circuit will get 12v.

    the idea is to connect the circuit to my shift light in car and when the light is ON it will be turn ON the cirucit but ONLY for 3 beeps no metter if the light is still ON.

    can i add only some kind of relay for that or if someone have any simple diagram for that it will be great.


    please advice



    many thanks
    Guy
  7. Bill_Marsden

    Bill_Marsden Moderator Staff Member

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    Again, simple enough to do. But first a side note, you're much better off starting your own thread, tacking on to someone else thread is called hijacking, and is discouraged.

    Just put a monostable on the beeper, set the duration for whatever it take to let 3 beeps out.

    555 Monostable

    Connect this circuit to pin 4 of your existing 555 (disconnecting it from the power).

    [​IMG]

    Adjust R4 for your 3 beeps.

    Attached Files:

  8. zx16v

    zx16v New Member

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    thank you for your fast replay

    the diagram you post is the one im looking for? 3 beeps and stops even the battery is still connected to the circuit?

    and sorry for posting here,if you want i will open a new thread.thanks!
    Last edited: Oct 13, 2009
  9. Bill_Marsden

    Bill_Marsden Moderator Staff Member

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    If a mod objects he'll take care of it.

    Basically, from the information you gave, the above circuit will modify it to do what you want. Post your schematic and I'll link them.
  10. ELECTRONERD

    ELECTRONERD Senior Member

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    Indeed, I would take Bill's advice. Piezoelectric buzzers don't really have a "pure" tone as oscillators do with a speaker.
  11. Bernard

    Bernard Senior Member

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    zx16v, for 3 beeps, might use a 556 & 4022, first section for clock, second for beep osc. Use out 2,4 & 6 to gate beep osc. ,3,& 5 spacers. Prob need another chip to control turn-on. Maybe someone will connect the dots.
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