Mad Max - Sequence to Start the War Rig

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by shift307, Jan 5, 2016.

  1. shift307

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jan 5, 2016
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    If you've seen Mad Max: Fury Road, you're familiar with the concept that no one other than Furiosa was able to start the War Rig becuase she was the only one who knew the "sequence." I'm looking to do something similar with a project; a lock box with simple analog switches and triggers that should only open in a proper sequence. I'm having a hard time understanding, though, how to ensure the switches are thrown in order. Currently, the design allows for the switches to be thrown closed in any order and *voila* the lock comes open. What do I need to do/use to create a "sequencing" effect (here comes the kicker) while still remaining analog?
     
  2. Papabravo

    Expert

    Feb 24, 2006
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    Sequential logic, as opposed to combinatorial logic, requires memory. To the extent that all electronics is essentially analog I would start with a standard FSM and proceed from there, if it does not meet your standards of analog purity, whatever they may be.
     
  3. KJ6EAD

    Senior Member

    Apr 30, 2011
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    You can use debounced switches, a counter such as a 4017 or 4022 and some AND gates to accomplish this but this is a digital logic solution. Are you trying to avoid a microcontroller or all forms of digital logic?

    There are existing designs for "electronic combination locks" around the internet. Searching for them may give you an acceptable solution unless your analog requirement is firm.
     
  4. mcgyvr

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 15, 2009
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    You can build some "logic" with relays and meet your analog requirement..
     
  5. GopherT

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    Nov 23, 2012
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    Interesting idea to code the starter in that movie, I have to admit that that toggle switch starter code was about the only piece of realistic technology in the movie (and it was even a conceivable DIY project). The rest of the movie - what a piece of crap show. I only watched it because it was the only movie on the only English Channel at the hotel I was staying at in Europe last month. I googled a review 10 minutes into the movie because it was so bad I couldn't believe what I was watching. One reviewer said he couldn't give it an honest review because he walked out after the first 10 minutes - he couldn't take it any more! Unfortunately for me, the same movie was on when I got back to the hotel on the second night of my trip.
     
  6. Dr.killjoy

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    Apr 28, 2013
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    They don't make movies like they use too..
     
  7. GopherT

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    This must have been a really bad year for movies... No joke.

    And they put "The Martian" in the comedy category for best Picture.

    image.jpg
     
  8. mcgyvr

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    I thought the Fury Road movie was "interesting" and right in-line with the original.. just plain crazy/wacky/weird stuff.. and some of the chicks were pretty hot :D
    Its a Mad Max movie.. what were you really expecting..
     
  9. GopherT

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    Some acting, and a lead actor who actually speaks (he only mutters a few words with so much filtering of anything over 100 Hz and amplification that you can barely understand him)
    Some cool vehicles that actually drove through sand (not CGI that look like cartoons)
    Some character development - in addition to max getting captured and his jacket stolen.
    Some background story on the setting and possibly the characters.

    The whole movie felt like one long chase scene.

    The original Mad Max movie wasn't great but much better than this. The second one was better but such a high budget vs. the first that it seemed disconnected. This most recent one should have been put in the animation category.
     
  10. Lestraveled

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    May 19, 2014
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    It was one long chase scene. Did you actually get something else out of the movie?? Sorry, this is a little off topic.

    Once, I made a 10 digit keyboard that had a fixed 4 digit code to start a shooting match. (Like a door access code.) I used relay and diode logic. It ran on a 12V battery.
     
  11. GopherT

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    Umm. I didn't think it would ever happen but, I might be getting old.
     
  12. AnalogKid

    Distinguished Member

    Aug 1, 2013
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    Depends on what you mean by "analog". In terms of contemporary electronic components, "analog switches" are not toggle switches (I'm guessing here, didn't see the movie). An analog switch is a digitally controlled analog signal multiplexer. If you mean toggle switches as opposed to a numeric keypad, then here's a spoiler - the internal circuitry was all digital.

    There are many sequential lock circuits. As a starter, envision a row of 6 flipflops, each with a toggle switch.
    SW1 clocks FF1.
    FF1's output goes to SW2.
    SW2's output goes to FF2's clock.
    FF2's output goes to FF3's switch.
    SW3's output goes to FF3's clock.
    FF3's output goes to FF4's switch. etc.

    In this way, each FF can be clocked only if all previous switches have been toggled in the correct order. Now, extend the switches with long wires, and mount them on a panel in a scrambled order. 6 switches, 3 chips (2 FF each), some resistors. Other circuits have error capture, so if you get 3 switches right then get one wrong, the circuit resets back to the beginning and doesn't tell you. LSI makes digital lock chips intended for a keypad that can be used with individual switches.

    ak
     
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  13. shift307

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jan 5, 2016
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    Where would I find the flipflops to do something like this? This kind of thing is way over my head.
     
  14. Lestraveled

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    May 19, 2014
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    @shift307

    OK, here is a simple circuit using 12V relays. You would make up a code and wire the switches to those numbers. You would need a numeric keyboard with individual switches. In order to get an output the switches have to be activated in sequence (SW1, SW2, SW3, SW4)

    [​IMG]

    When SW1 is pressed, 12V is supplied to the coil that closes its contacts. This latches the relay "ON". It also supplies 12V to the second switch, on down the line. Does this look to be within your skill set?
     
  15. shift307

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jan 5, 2016
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    This looks very do-able! Thanks for your help!
     
  16. rfagen

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    Jan 19, 2013
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    Are those momentary switches or toggles? If they were momentary, couldn't you get the circuit to activate by mashing them all down at once? Would you circumvent that by having some kind of feedback that kills the source if any two buttons are held down at the same time?
     
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  17. AnalogKid

    Distinguished Member

    Aug 1, 2013
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    You know that only because you've seen the schematic. A bank of 6 unmarked switches has 64 possible combinations and no clue about possible shortcuts, error trapping, maximum number of incorrect attempts, etc. That's more than enough to defeat anyone not thinking of binary sequencing.

    ak
     
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