Lumen output of a 160W UHP lamp?

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by jj_alukkas, May 20, 2013.

  1. jj_alukkas

    Thread Starter Well-Known Member

    Jan 8, 2009
    751
    5
    Hello everyone,

    I have a Sony Projector with a brightness of 1500 lumens. The UHP lamp used is rated for 160W and 'designed to provide a brightness of 1500 lumens' to this particular projector, so how many lumens would this 160W UHP bulb be actually producing? Can anyone tell me about the lumens/Watt for UHP lamps? After hours of googling, It seems to be anywhere between 2600-3500 lumens, could it be true? The UHP lamp model is LMP-H160 and projector model is VPL-CX11 and I was just studying the efficiencies of these lamps as I was hearing them for the first time.
     
  2. LDC3

    Active Member

    Apr 27, 2013
    920
    160
    It is difficult to equate lumens with watts since there are several factors involved in the design of the light and how it shine the light. Watts measures the amount of power the light consumes. It is dependent on the makeup of the filament (thickness, length and material). Lumens measure the brightness of the light on a surface of defined area at a defined distance. A light with a reflector would be brighter than the light without a reflector. Different brands use different material for their reflectors, as well as slightly different shapes. In short, I don't think it would be easy to say that a light rated at x watts will produce y amount of lumens.
     
  3. jj_alukkas

    Thread Starter Well-Known Member

    Jan 8, 2009
    751
    5
    Thank you for the reply, I was just looking for an approximate output for these types lamps for the rated power, just like we say approxiamtely 80 lumens per 1W of led power.
     
  4. GopherT

    AAC Fanatic!

    Nov 23, 2012
    6,010
    3,785
    You can refer to the lumen efficiency in the same terms (about 10 to 20 lumens per watt for incandescent). What you cannot do with incandescent (or LEDs or any othe lighting) is apply half the voltage, calculate the new wattage and expect the same lumen efficiency.

    Good comparison of all lighting types on Wikipedia.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Luminous_efficacy
     
  5. jj_alukkas

    Thread Starter Well-Known Member

    Jan 8, 2009
    751
    5
    According to luminous efficacy, the lamp output could be anywhere from 5000 lumens to 6000.
     
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