Low voltage Schottky bridge rectifier

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by triggr999, Apr 14, 2009.

  1. triggr999

    Thread Starter New Member

    Apr 14, 2009
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    i am completing a school project on vibration energy harvesting using magnets. We have completed the design and are constructing the harvester now. the overall size of the device is 5cm L 2cm h &1.5cmW

    my problem is with the output device.
    i am expecting an 100Hz 5V Ac signal from the coil i want to use a Schottky bridge rectifier with a output capacitor to store energy to finally power an device to be determined later.

    i am having trouble finding a suitable Schottky device and the best way to hook it up

    Ron
     
  2. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
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    Almost any Shottky diode will work, you're talking a low current application. Are you going to order them mail order? They look pretty much like regular diodes.
     
  3. triggr999

    Thread Starter New Member

    Apr 14, 2009
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    thanks
    yes it will be low current i was hoping to buy the rectifier in a single package
    your thoughts
    i can mail order them or i can pick them up from a store
     
  4. SgtWookie

    Expert

    Jul 17, 2007
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    What do you expect the current through the diodes to be?
     
  5. triggr999

    Thread Starter New Member

    Apr 14, 2009
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    we are expecting about 250mA from our calculations but
    we will not know for sure until it is working
    we are trying to do a few things at once to meet our time requirements
     
  6. SgtWookie

    Expert

    Jul 17, 2007
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    I don't know of any Schottky rectifier bridges offhand.

    However, for minimum losses across the bridge, consider using 1N5817 Schottky diodes. They are single diodes in the familiar axial lead package. You'll get around 0.3v across the junction with a 200mA current.

    If you were expecting less current, you could use a BAT54A dual common anode and a BAT54C dual common cathode pair as a bridge rectifier. They're in a SOT-23 package, which is very small; a bit tough to work with for a hobbyist - but the board "footprint" would be quite miniscule.
     
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