Lost trying to identify SMD component

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by venturasurf, Mar 22, 2012.

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  1. venturasurf

    Thread Starter New Member

    Mar 22, 2012
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    Hello everyone,

    I'm working on this RC board for a toy that I'm trying to build, there are some changes that I want to make to it but I'm having trouble identifying some SMDs on the board itself.

    I think A is a resistor but I haven't seen blue ones before. Notice the stacked zeros on some of their codes. These are the ones I'm having most trouble identifying.

    B I'm pretty sure is a resistor

    C is a ceramic capacitor? They're all coded AA5, AA4, etc.

    D I believe is a transistor. Most of them are coded 5AV.

    E is a diode

    F is a resistor - does 000 mean it's a jumper (no resistance)?

    [​IMG]

    Thank you all!
     
  2. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
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    6,817
    All zeros means zero ohm jumper.
    1002 means 100 and 2 more zeros, or 10,000 ohms
    1722 means 172 and 2 zeros or, 17,200 ohms.
    Blue or black doesn't mean anything.

    everything else is right except I don't know what the capacitor markings mean.

    5AV avd AA5 mean nothing to me. I have seen that manufacturers do strange markings like that, and somebody (like the manufacturer) knows what they mean, but I don't know how to look them up.
     
  3. Evil Lurker

    Member

    Aug 25, 2011
    117
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    A: An resistor with an oddball non standard resistance. Its fuzzy but want to say 17.8k.
    B: Those are what I understand to be jumper resistors supposedly they have no (actually very little) resistance.
    C: MLCC or multilayer monolithic capacitor. Only way to tell value is to pull it off and measure it with a DMM.
    D: Unknown. Could be transistor, diode, mosfet who knows. Only way to tell is to examine how it is placed in the circuit and/or looking at what few scarce markings it may have... maybe a letter, number or several of them them. There are codebooks out there to decipher SMD components.
    E. Diode of some sort. I see lots of them like that. I believe the green indicates that it is a zener diode.
     
  4. rfredel

    New Member

    Jan 23, 2011
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  5. venturasurf

    Thread Starter New Member

    Mar 22, 2012
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    Thank you so much for the help everyone, this got me going in the right direction. I'm just gonna pull the funky resistors with the stacked 00's and test them individually for values.
     
  6. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
    16,310
    6,817
    Probably isn't necessary to pull them off the board. Parallel paths tend to make the measured resistance lower, and you can't get lower than zero. Measure them as is and see if any of them are NOT zero.

    Then you can lift them off the board if you still aren't sure.
     
  7. THE_RB

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 11, 2008
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    The resistors marked 000 are wire link jumpers, ie resistors with zero resistance.

    All the other resistors are clearly marked with a standard 4 digit RRRM code.
     
  8. venturasurf

    Thread Starter New Member

    Mar 22, 2012
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    Thank you. About the ones with the little stacked 0's in the codes, are those digits an 8 or are they 00? Everywhere I look I can't find resistors with RRRM codes with 5 digits. Would resistor A be 170k?
     
  9. THE_RB

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 11, 2008
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    Most SMD resistors are RRM labelled but some quality ones in 1% tolerance are RRRM labelled, it's the same for quality through-hole resistors too.

    I can't see the photo well enough for resistor A but it looks like 1702 which would be 170 + 2 zeros (ie 17000 ohms). Or if it's 1782 that would be 17800 ohms.

    It's very unusual to see precision specialty value resistors in a "toy", these are more often found in test equipment. What exactly is the PCB from, do you have more info and photos of the whole board (the whole product?).
     
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