Looking for

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by iambigd, Mar 18, 2010.

  1. iambigd

    Thread Starter New Member

    Mar 18, 2010
    2
    0
    Does anyone know what this is and where I can get it? It has died on my LED Whip for my ATV and I can't seem to find it anywhere. Any help would be awesome. The company I purchase this from wants me to purchase the entire whip and at 189 bucks I just cant see doing that if I can find this somewhere.

    This powers a single Super Bright LED from a 12v ATV Battery.

    Again, any help would be excellent.

    Thanks

    BigD

    [​IMG]
     
  2. KMoffett

    AAC Fanatic!

    Dec 19, 2007
    2,574
    230
    Did you offer to send them the dead one, so they won't think you are just trying to make you own pole?

    Probably just a constant current regulator to limit the current to the LED. If it is, that's less that $10 in parts.

    Ken
     
  3. BMorse

    Senior Member

    Sep 26, 2009
    2,675
    234
    Is it that part that is bad or is it the LED module? If you connect that device to power, can you measure to see if you have any power coming out of the LED connections? If it is a defective module, and does not have any warranty, why not open it up to see what i inside? It would be a lot easier to figure out what it does for the LED, as Kmoffett said, it could be some kind of current regulator for the LED similar to a buckpuck LED driver....

    B. Morse
     
  4. nomurphy

    AAC Fanatic!

    Aug 8, 2005
    567
    12
    http://www.quick-light.com/quicklight101307_006.htm

    Quick Light uses light emitting diodes (LED). Traditional lights have very fragile filaments that do not hold up to vibration. We have been through many different company's LEDs. After a long search we found the ultimate in LEDs.
    The Silicon Vally has just came out with one of the worlds brightest LEDs. All of the small typical LEDs measure their light output in Milli candelas. 100,000 Milli candelas = 1 candelas. Quick Light's LEDs are measured in candelas, with a light output of over 130 candelas. The LED is mounted in the base, and the light shines up through the flag pole quick release into the poles patented fiber optic. With the LED mounted in the base, there is much less vibration and movement at the base compared to way up at the top of the flag pole getting wiped around. The flag pole comes with a voltage regulator that you can mount remotely for a very clean looking whip. The LED is wired with two wires, a positive and negative. This is very important to take note of. For a long life of reliable use we do not use the frame as the ground that may not make connection, due to paint, power cote, or rust. All the wires can be and is suggested to be soldered, making a very permanent and reliable connection. With no wires in the flag pole we have now eliminated the un reliable wired plug.
     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2010
  5. BMorse

    Senior Member

    Sep 26, 2009
    2,675
    234

    Ok, so how does this help the op in finding a solution to his problem? We know quick-light uses LED's for the flagpoles.... we know the regulator is a separate module (which is in the first post).....we know the LEd is mounted in the base.....

    B. Morse
     
  6. iambigd

    Thread Starter New Member

    Mar 18, 2010
    2
    0
    I know this is the problem because I actually removed it from this whip and tested it on my other one it didn't work. I think it's some type of regulator. I just don't know for sure.

    I have a few more pics is it helps...

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  7. KMoffett

    AAC Fanatic!

    Dec 19, 2007
    2,574
    230
    Since it has wires between the module and LED, I would cut the wires (you can splice later) and use the "diode" function on a DVM to check the LED. Or a battery and series resistor to see if it lights. Then again it could be a laser diode, with a built in current limiter, and the module is a voltage regulator to drop the battery voltage down. But, if it were a laser diode they probably have touted that in their ads. ;)

    Ken
     
  8. SgtWookie

    Expert

    Jul 17, 2007
    22,182
    1,728
    A quick look at the face of the module indicates that it produces 1400mA output, which is also 1.4A.

    You might use a BuckPuck in it's place, although they stop at 1000mA.
    http://www.ledsupply.com/buckpuck.php

    However, has it been determined whether or not the LED in the base of the whip is good?

    You might get a 10 Ohm power resistor from Radio Shack and use that to limit the current to the LED, just for testing purposes. If one assumes that the LED has a Vf of at least 2v, then (14v-2v)/1.4A = 8.57 Ohms. That would be safely below the regulator output current. Then you can measure the Vf (forward voltage) of the LED using a DVM set to the 20v scale.

    [​IMG]

    If there is no difference in voltage across the resistor, the LED is open. If the system voltage is the same as the voltage across the resistor, the LED is shorted.
     
  9. SgtWookie

    Expert

    Jul 17, 2007
    22,182
    1,728
    Oops, cross-posted.

    I linked to the wrong page; you really need the wired version that's non-dimming for DC
    http://ledsupply.com/wired-buckpuck.php
    Look at the 3023-D-N version. If you ran a pair of 700mA BuckPucks in parallel, you'd get a total of 1400mA out, matching the original units' performance.
    700mA version:
    http://ledsupply.com/03023-d-n-700.php

    [eta]
    You really should measure the voltage across the output on another one of these whips that have a working LED. If the original driver is a buck-type converter, the output will be at least several volts lower than your system voltage. If it is a buck-boost type driver, the output will be anywhere from a volt or two less than system to much higher than system voltage.
     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2010
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