Load Balance

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by Turdnugget, Dec 6, 2015.

  1. Turdnugget

    Thread Starter New Member

    Mar 3, 2012
    23
    3
    I'm learning about Transformers and had a question maybe someone could help me with...

    Lets say i have a basic transformer with a resistor as a secondary load.
    Secondary load is floating not connected to any ground.
    AC applied to primary.
    When we measure the resistor we can see the AC voltage provided to the load.
    The thing I'm curios about is could there be a unbalanced voltage on the load
    For example the load reads 12vac but could a transformer provide more electrical force to one side of the winding.
    Possibly somthing like max voltage 7v and min voltage -5v maintaining the 12v pk to pk voltage which is what we see with the scope
    The scope would not know the off set it has for the AC wave across the load since its simply referenced across the load..
    How can we detect accurately voltage balance on a isolated load? If there is one.
     
  2. WBahn

    Moderator

    Mar 31, 2012
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    If the load is floating, then the notion of "balance" becomes nonsensical -- it's floating! As soon as you make any connection to any part of the secondary circuit you establish a voltage reference for the entire secondary circuit. Prior to that it can be at any potential relative to the rest of the world that you want.
     
  3. Lestraveled

    Well-Known Member

    May 19, 2014
    1,957
    1,215
    To add to what WBahn said:
    The offset could be hundreds of volts. It is floating. Without connection to any other reference. To say that the transformer provides more electrical force to one side is without merit, a floating load, by definition, is self equalizing.
     
  4. Turdnugget

    Thread Starter New Member

    Mar 3, 2012
    23
    3
    This more has to do with the force from the transformer than it does the force seen by the resistor..
    The transformer provides a pushing force on one end and a pulling force on the other end at the same instance of time does it not?...
    Is one electrically stronger than the other?
    good example,
    Could the proximity effect between winding cause such a imbalance?
    In a sense it would seem a transformer as a source can have unbalance created from the magnetic characteristics of the coil itself.
     
  5. WBahn

    Moderator

    Mar 31, 2012
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    4,796
    Again, the answer is no.
     
  6. Turdnugget

    Thread Starter New Member

    Mar 3, 2012
    23
    3
    Ok Thanks .
     
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