LM317 Voltage Regulator

Discussion in 'The Completed Projects Collection' started by Wendy, Sep 26, 2014.

  1. Wendy

    Thread Starter Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
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    [​IMG]

    I have friend who was going to spend $30 on a 1.5V output wall wart. I told her I would build a simple regulator instead. I overcomplicated it by printing a 3D printed box, other than that it is pretty simple.

    I came up with this...

    [​IMG]
    R2 is a 500Ω, which makes it adjustable from 1.25V to 6.46V.

    Here is the box I made...

    [​IMG]

    And the final product is very unimpressive. But then, so is this project. :)

    [​IMG]

    I have included the 3D print files. The first batch was a bit off, so I had to reprint the bottom, which is included.
     
    darrough and imraneesa like this.
  2. bertus

    Administrator

    Apr 5, 2008
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    Hello,

    Nice little project.
    Would it be an idea to have a multiturn potentiometer?
    Also would it be possible to have access to the potentiometer with a closed box?
    (a little hole above the potentiometer).

    Bertus
     
  3. Wendy

    Thread Starter Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
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    Yes, but the box is a tight press fit, and the regulator will adjust 1.25V to 6.46V. I used what I had.
     
  4. Alec_t

    AAC Fanatic!

    Sep 17, 2013
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    Neat.
    Are the in/out connectors identical? Hard to tell from the pic. It wouldn't do to confuse them.
    What is the estimated materials cost for the box?
     
  5. Wendy

    Thread Starter Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
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    The material for the box are around $0.30, it is pretty small. Getting access to a 3D printer is the thing.
     
  6. b1u3sf4n09

    Member

    May 23, 2014
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    Generally when I think wall wart, I think 120VAC to VDC using flyback or switching. This design seems to be DC to DC. Am I missing something?
     
  7. Wendy

    Thread Starter Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
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    Most people have wall warts kicking around. In this case she has a 9VDC wall wart already in hand. Even so, a simple generic can be had much cheaper if you had to buy it.

    Yes, it is a simple DC-DC converter. One connector is a female power connector, the other a female RCA phone (which is what she asked for).
     
  8. R!f@@

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 2, 2009
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    Bill..I really admire how you go about making projects neat and tidy.
    I wish I had the time to do that.
     
  9. JohnInTX

    Moderator

    Jun 26, 2012
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    Nice, Bill! A couple of questions..
    What software did you use to generate the 3D file?
    Did you print it at Tanner's? (electronic supply in Dallas area)
     
  10. Wendy

    Thread Starter Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
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    I printed it at Dallas Maker Space (google it). They are directly next door to Tanners, even use the same 3d printer. This is not a coincidence.

    SketchUp is free and easy to use. You may need to get with me off line to learn how to use it with a 3D printer.
     
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  11. JohnInTX

    Moderator

    Jun 26, 2012
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    Thanks, Bill. Next time I'm over Tanner's way, I'll drop in on DMS. If I get serious (non-lazy) about 3D, I'll ping you via PM.
    Best,
    RJO
     
  12. Wendy

    Thread Starter Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
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    They use a RFID for members to let them in. You can go Thursday night for the weekly open house. If you get with me via PM I'll give you a private tour.
     
  13. nerdegutta

    Moderator

    Dec 15, 2009
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    Nice project, Bill.

    I'll make one myself, to use with my RPi project. Think I'll add a heatsink.

    To draw models, and export them to *.stl files I'm using Freecad. It is completely free, and there are versions for both Linux and Windows. No need for licence or plug-ins. They also have a well functioning forum.
     
  14. Wendy

    Thread Starter Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
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    If you check the files there are .stl (stereo lithography) files included. This is the files that most 3D printers convert into g-code, which is the actual machine controller code.
     
  15. nerdegutta

    Moderator

    Dec 15, 2009
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    It works perfect! Thanks for sharing, Bill. :)
     
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