Line cords and cats

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by beenthere, Dec 27, 2010.

  1. beenthere

    Thread Starter Retired Moderator

    Apr 20, 2004
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    A major hazard for cats in the home is burns to the mouth from biting line cords. One possible outcome is outright death. If not, the damage may be too much for the cat to survive.

    The damage results from an arc across the mouth. This can result in major burns to the gums and the tongue.

    We have a kitten of about 5 months that chomped a lamp cord. He did not show symptoms until the burns infected. While we got him to the vet and the infection is under control, the cat does not look likely to live.

    Besides hard to see damage in the mouth (at least 1/3rd of the tongue is gone), the poor little guy has an enormous bloat in his midsection. We are able to use a big syringe to squirt liquefied food into his mouth, but he is not getting better. We are taking him back to the vet, but do not expect good news.

    If you have a cat, be sure to create an aversive reaction to dangling line cords.
     
  2. retched

    AAC Fanatic!

    Dec 5, 2009
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    I would think that is a pretty adverse reaction.

    Sorry to hear that beenthere.

    We used "bitter apple".

    I am not sure if it works equal for cat or dog, but it tastes horrid to them and they learn quickly that lamp cords, table corners, couches, remote controls, are not to be mouthed.

    I think there is something about silicone rubber that is attractive to animals.

    Rats and silicone insulation, especially in cars, is well known. But cats also seem to be attracted to it.

    Our family cat used to have a few play toys, but one was his favorite. It was a simple rubber ball on a springy stick.

    We had the feathers on a string, on a stick, and others, but he would not just play with the ball-stick, but he would cuddle with it too.

    [ed]
    Apparently sold for dogs, but works for both cats and dogs:
    http://dogs.about.com/cs/toppicks/gr/bitter_apple_gr.htm

    Also, good chew prohibiting advice:
    http://www.stretcher.com/stories/03/03nov03a.cfm
    [/ed]
     
    Last edited: Dec 27, 2010
  3. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
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    Bitter Apple works with my dogs.
     
  4. someonesdad

    Senior Member

    Jul 7, 2009
    1,585
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    That bums me out, beenthere, because I love cats. In the last few decades, we've had many cats in this house, but we've not lost one to such an injury (although I've seen a number of teeth marks in power cords). When a cat is seen chewing on a cord, there's lots of yelling and the cat gets a good swipe. This seems to have been effective enough for us to have avoided this injury in any of our cats.

    We once had a litter of kittens and one was outside. It was Halloween and I was going to move our little 1979 Mazda GLC station wagon (it was a fantastic little car) so the trick-or-treaters could get to the door a little more easily. I started to let the clutch out and I felt a resistance. I thought one of the kids had left a broom in the driveway and I was driving over a broomstick. I pulled the car around, then came back in to see a little black kitten dragging its hindquarters into the house by just the two front paws. I realized that wasn't a broomstick I ran over -- it was a cat! Talk about a horrible experience!

    The amazing part of the story is that my wife rushed the kitten to our vet. He listened to the story and checked the kitten out. Verdict -- no treatment; he'd probably recover fine. He did! Apparently, the young animals have quite a bit of resiliency for such injuries because they're loose and still growing. He was adopted into a happy home not much later.
     
  5. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
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    I like cats, I really love kittens, but they grow up so fast. You can't help but get attached to the little devils.

    Sorry to hear about your loss Beenthere. From what you've said it is a tough call whether it would be better for the little guy to pass easy or fight his way back.

    Don't know why, I've never had that problem. I got tire of loosing cats to the outdoors, and made this blob of a critter a full time indoor cat.

    [​IMG]
     
  6. retched

    AAC Fanatic!

    Dec 5, 2009
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    WOW. Now thats a fat cat.
     
  7. Robin Mitchell

    Well-Known Member

    Oct 25, 2009
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    thats worrying, were are the live cords in your house?
    If my pet chomped down on a live wire i would be more concerned about the human population because there are live wires NOT inside walls :p
    Sorry about the cat :/ but i would get it put down.
    (We have a small holding so i may seem a little heartless, dont get attached to animals)
     
  8. nerdegutta

    Moderator

    Dec 15, 2009
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    Sorry to hear about the cat.:(
     
  9. retched

    AAC Fanatic!

    Dec 5, 2009
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    A lamp cord, if bitten through, will short circuit in the cats mouth.. Even if the lamp is off, the cat will complete the circuit.
     
  10. Robin Mitchell

    Well-Known Member

    Oct 25, 2009
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    Oh a lamp cord, ..sorry XD
     
  11. maxpower097

    Well-Known Member

    Feb 20, 2009
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    Last edited: Jan 16, 2011
  12. Markd77

    Senior Member

    Sep 7, 2009
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    Poor little kitty. I guess a lot of people are just lucky and never have it happen. When my family had cats we never considered that possibility. If I ever get one, there is going to be deterrent on all cables.
     
  13. maxpower097

    Well-Known Member

    Feb 20, 2009
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    Last edited: Jan 16, 2011
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