light switch

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by Lightfire, Feb 3, 2011.

  1. Lightfire

    Thread Starter Well-Known Member

    Oct 5, 2010
    690
    21
    Well, I can't figure out how I can put the wires on that kind of switch. :)

    Please see the attachment. :)

    If someone can instruct me how, I would greatly appreciate it.

    P.S. I do know where to put, but it can't be fixed just stable. I mean if I pick up the wire, it just simply pull out from the switch. Arg???
     
  2. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
    20,764
    2,534
    Different countries have different standards. The ones in the USA look a lot different. I assume that is a 250 VAC switch used in house wiring in your area (Phillipines). It could be designed for a specific gauge of wire, which would account for your problems. Most low voltage switches are designed to either solder on (never solder AC wiring), or have screws to tighten down on wires.
     
  3. Lightfire

    Thread Starter Well-Known Member

    Oct 5, 2010
    690
    21
    Yes, it is.

    How can I know the specific gauge of wire for that switch?

    Why???
     
  4. Adjuster

    Well-Known Member

    Dec 26, 2010
    2,147
    300
    Building wiring codes may prohibit soldered connections. (Can anyone confirm that?) In any case, the components used for AC wiring in buildings normally use screw terminals or some other form of mechanical fixing.

    You should certainly never attempt to solder anything not designed for it, particularly if large voltages are involved. For instance, applying heat to a screw terminal could melt or char insulation, leading to failure.

    There is however nothing magical that rules out soldered joints passing alternating currents. Soldered connections are used in some AC circuits within appliances, even at mains voltages. Many components used in things like mains power supplies have solder terminations.
     
  5. magnet18

    Senior Member

    Dec 22, 2010
    1,232
    124
    Are you certain you don't mean outlet?
    If i remember correctly, many countries have outlets that look like that and i don't see anything on there that looks.... switchable
    [EDIT]
    [​IMG]
    like the one on the right
     
  6. CDRIVE

    Senior Member

    Jul 1, 2008
    2,223
    99
    If it weren't for the absence of any visible wall plate mounting holes I would agree that the photo may be a frontal view. Is it possible that those are, in fact, (rear) terminal holes? Is it also possible that the OP has not first loosened the terminal screws (not visible in photo, but typically located on the side of the case) - inserted the wire and then tightened it?

    Also,.. take note of the stopped notch molded into the face of the case, midway between the two sets of holes. If I'm not mistaken, that's an insulation strip gage.
     
    Last edited: Feb 3, 2011
  7. magnet18

    Senior Member

    Dec 22, 2010
    1,232
    124
    Excellent point, probably correct although i have an outlet in my garage with no frontal mounting holes, there are metal brackets coming off it, if it is of similar design they may be hidden in the darkness

    Lightfire, could you possibly post a well lit picture?
     
  8. CDRIVE

    Senior Member

    Jul 1, 2008
    2,223
    99
    What you're describing sounds like a GFI outlet. They have two holes at both ends of the outlet. Two holes are for mounting to the J-Box and the other two, which are threaded (6-32), are for mounting the cover plate. Wall switches in the US use the same arrangement. That said, you may be correct too!
     
  9. magnet18

    Senior Member

    Dec 22, 2010
    1,232
    124
    Yea, it is, i was just saying that its possible outlets in the phillipenes could be laid out like this, ive never seen one so i really don't know.
     
  10. Lightfire

    Thread Starter Well-Known Member

    Oct 5, 2010
    690
    21
    OK. See my attachments and ready to judge. :D :D :D
     
  11. shortbus

    AAC Fanatic!

    Sep 30, 2009
    4,000
    1,512
    Those look like standard 'push-in' switches. They should take 14 or 12 gage solid copper wire. They won't work with stranded wire, only solid wire.

    In the middle of the unit(switch), there is a shallow groove. This groove is used to measure how much insulation to remove. A removing that much insulation from the wire, you will push the stripped end into the hole in the end of the unit.

    If you want to remove the wire, you just push a small thin screwdriver into the slot between the holes and pull the wire out.
     
  12. wayneh

    Expert

    Sep 9, 2010
    12,083
    3,021
    It looks to me that this is a 3-switch module, and that the connections are indeed meant to be for a specific gauge wire, or small range of gauges (eg. 12-14 ga.), stripped to the length indicated on the back, and inserted straight into those holes. I suspect that the switched can be used to make the connection in either the up or down position, which you choose by inserting the wire into one side or the other of the switch's back. Connection is likely made on the side opposite the depressed face of the switch, but I'd check that with a meter.

    You can't use this with narrow gauge hookup wire, eg. 22 gauge. If you're using low voltage and want to use this switch, you could stick a length of 12 ga. wire into the desired hole, and then solder smaller wire to the other end of that. Cover the solder joint with heat-shrink. Do NOT do this with high (>12v) voltage or current (> 1 amp), and try to mechanically stabilize the switch and the wires. Too risky otherwise.
     
  13. floomdoggle

    Senior Member

    Sep 1, 2008
    217
    2
    What gauge wire are you using? In the US it would be 14 Ga solid.
     
  14. CDRIVE

    Senior Member

    Jul 1, 2008
    2,223
    99
    I'm surprised they're still using that spring loaded design over there. We used them in the US for a short while but discontinued them for fire safety reasons.
     
  15. Audioguru

    New Member

    Dec 20, 2007
    9,411
    896
    I think a thread asking about "Wiring an electrical switch in the Philippines" should be asked on a forum in the Philippines.
     
  16. CDRIVE

    Senior Member

    Jul 1, 2008
    2,223
    99
    They have Mani Pakaw but not sure about a forum like AAC. :D
     
Loading...