Light from glass enclosed candle - how far can it "direct" light?

Discussion in 'General Science' started by RogueRose, May 14, 2016.

  1. RogueRose

    Thread Starter Member

    Oct 10, 2014
    189
    4
    Do you know the colored glass candle holders that were often sold as insect repellents for patio's. The one's I'm talking about were popular from the late 80's until at least 2000. The ones I remember had a "quilted" pattern like Mason jelly jars.

    [​IMG]

    Here are the candles I found for sale now, but I don't think they are the same texture as the ones I'm talking about, the one I'm speaking about is like above... The old ones may have been shaped like the three right below but with the pattern above. ANYWAY -> to the bottom...

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    I was at a hotel and looked over at a window and say a spot of red light going through the double panes. It was linerally projected and I could see some light on the ceiling but it was diffused a good bit. I couldn't figure out where it could come from and followed the path from the ceiling to the window (where red light could be seen caught in a tiny spot of the glass, if you know what I mean, just a glint) and that pointed down 3 stories to a candle about 80-90 YARDS away. This was on a private patio so it wasn't used by anyone but those in that room.

    The light on the ceiling was strongly noticeable in a pitch black room, as if some LED in the room were showing on the ceiling (this was confirmed to not be the case).

    I don't believe a single candle could behave like this and there are a number of other oddities that point to it not being a candle (burning all the time w/o anyone around..).

    What are your thoughts on this. It should be obvious as to why I asked this in an electronics forum, IMHO that is.. Thanks.
     
  2. KL7AJ

    AAC Fanatic!

    Nov 4, 2008
    2,040
    287
  3. RogueRose

    Thread Starter Member

    Oct 10, 2014
    189
    4
    I considered that but have tried replication with many similar candles and I get nothing more than 30-40ft, not 240-270ft, passing through 2 glass panes and smoggy air... (I was implying something nefarious about the device BTW, as there is no other means of producing that much directed light from my current limited understanding.)
     
  4. BR-549

    Well-Known Member

    Sep 22, 2013
    1,987
    388
    If it doesn't flicker......could be fake candle led.
     
  5. RogueRose

    Thread Starter Member

    Oct 10, 2014
    189
    4
    No flicker, but this was back in 94-00. Never really thought about the flicker and it was there during rain (patio umbrella). Could it be a laser and if so, what would that be used for. Could it release smell somehow.

    The thing is I REALLY can't see the people whole porch this is having an electric candle, it would be a real flame. I can't think of anything that would project light that far other than laser. Even during rain it was visible from the window (although the light on the ceiling wasn't noticeable but the window had big drops of H2O on it..

    So anyone think it is a laser, if not, what else? It also had an open top or the lid was below the lip that couldn't be seen with binoculars.
     
  6. shortbus

    AAC Fanatic!

    Sep 30, 2009
    4,010
    1,530
    If you were looking at people through binoculars and they saw you, it may have been a laser gun sight.
     
  7. BR-549

    Well-Known Member

    Sep 22, 2013
    1,987
    388
    Now you mention rain. Do you know the reflective properties of a drop of water?

    Do you know the possible reflective combinations of a billion drops of water?

    A drop not only reflects, it focuses. There's another billion possibilities.

    I seriously doubt you have found a new laser effect.
     
  8. RogueRose

    Thread Starter Member

    Oct 10, 2014
    189
    4
    I used binoculars to look at the light/"candle". Don't think there was any guns involved on their end unless it was a micro-derringer embedded in the glass container.
     
  9. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
    20,766
    2,536
    Think of a projector,where light is columnized and sent long distances with an image that must stay focused all the way.

    In all the various glass wear made it would be surprising if really good lenses were not accidentally made during the process.
     
  10. ian field

    Distinguished Member

    Oct 27, 2012
    4,415
    784
    .[/QUOTE]

    The radio station I listen to has a "Freaky facts" slot on weekday nights - one of those is; a candle can bee seen 40 miles away on a clear night with no moon. It doesn't specify whether its just the bare candle, or in any kind of lantern.

    A string of blue LEDs is probably better for a bug lantern - the ones with fluorescent tubes are nearly UV, you can get UV LEDs, but they're harmful to eyes.
     
Loading...