1. jerrymyersmills

    Thread Starter New Member

    Mar 22, 2011
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    0
    Hi
    folks , i want to know if installing a lever of about five inches between a 12DCV actuator and the load will cause a decrease in the torque significantly?The torque is rated at 400 IbS with a stroke length of 10'' from progressiveautomations.The linear actuator is going to be at the top with the load beneath with a pivot in the middle.
    I don not want the torque to be decreased. Does anybody have any experience in thIS regard.
     
  2. strantor

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 3, 2010
    4,302
    1,988
    I can't picture what you've described. could you picture it for me? It sounds like you intend to use the "running in" or "retracting" action of the actuator to lift; make sure the product is rated for that; some are only designed to move a load with the "running out" or "extend" action.
     
  3. SgtWookie

    Expert

    Jul 17, 2007
    22,182
    1,728
    If the fulcrum point is at the exact center of the lever, you will lose some torque due to the resistance of the fulcrum/pivot point.

    If the fulcrum point is further from the actuator than the load, then the torque/pressure will be increased with the penalty of a shorter radius of travel.

    If the fulcrum point is closer to the actuator than the load, the torque/pressure will be reduced, with a wider radius of travel.
     
  4. BillB3857

    Senior Member

    Feb 28, 2009
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  5. jerrymyersmills

    Thread Starter New Member

    Mar 22, 2011
    29
    0
    I am going to use both "running in" or "retracting" actions.The whole thing looks like the alphabet 'Z'.With the actuator at the top ,fulcrum in the middle and load down.Do you now get the picture?
     
  6. strantor

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 3, 2010
    4,302
    1,988
    Ok then it sounds like your fulcrum, or pivot point, is in the center. As SGT Wookie said, if it is in the center, then you should have the same force and stroke length available. The thing about extening and retracting is only precautionary, as almost all actuators are designed to move a load in both directions, but I have come across one before that didn't, so I thought it was worth the mention.
     
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