Lead Acid Battery

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by RG23, Apr 28, 2011.

  1. RG23

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Dec 6, 2010
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    I am using Lead Acid Battery PS 1230

    When I used the charger, the battery got melted.

    The charger was GlobTek

    Input: 100-240V ~1.6A MAX 50-60Hz, VA

    Output: +14.7V 0.9A

    What you think might be the reason for battery damage?
     
  2. retched

    AAC Fanatic!

    Dec 5, 2009
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    Did you connect the battery backwards?
     
  3. SgtWookie

    Expert

    Jul 17, 2007
    22,182
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    A datasheet for your PS-1230 battery can be viewed here:
    http://www.batterystore.com/Powersonic/PSpdf/PS1230.pdf

    Your charger specifications (0.9a, 14.7v) seem to be within the datasheets' specifications for charging.

    As Retched suggested, you may have connected the charger to the battery improperly (reversed connections) or the battery or the charger could have been defective.

    Before attempting to charge another battery, the charger performance should be verified.
     
  4. designnut

    Member

    Apr 21, 2011
    33
    1
    A reversed battery causes current to flow through the rectifier diodes nearly a short on the battery.
     
  5. RG23

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Dec 6, 2010
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    you may have connected the charger to the battery improperly (reversed connections)

    Can you please elaborate?
     
  6. retched

    AAC Fanatic!

    Dec 5, 2009
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    The red wire from the charger should have been connected to the POSITIVE (POS) (+) Terminal of the battery.

    The black wire from the charger should have been connected to the NEGATIVE (NEG) (-) Terminal of the battery.

    If you connected the RED wire to the (-) terminal of the battery, you did a no-no
     
  7. RG23

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Dec 6, 2010
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    I connected the charger to the battery correctly (no reverse connections)

    I tried testing the battery charger

    When I provide the required input to the charger

    I am getting 14.8V between the output terminals which is correct

    but the current between those two output terminals is 0.3 to 0.4A and not 0.9A

    Does it indicate the charger is bad?

    Should the output current be 0.9A as soon as I provide the input?

    Also I tried testing the other battery if it gives the correct voltage and it gave 12V.
    Is there any other way I can test the battery?
     
  8. retched

    AAC Fanatic!

    Dec 5, 2009
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    Most "good" battery testers will apply a load to the battery under test.

    This is how the "health" of batteries are usually tested.

    For instance, a dead battery, left sitting, may read 12v with a standard multi-meter. But as soon as a load is connected, the voltage can drop to 10v or lower.

    The automotive and deep cycle battery tester I use has a heating element with the voltage meter, allowing the the battery to be under load when tested.

    If your fully charged battery is reading 12v, it is likely dead.. it should read ~13v.

    http://www.batteryuniversity.com
     
  9. RG23

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Dec 6, 2010
    301
    2
    yes you are right

    but the battery melted while charging

    So I could not test the fully charged battery

    I mentioned about the battery charger in my previous post

    Can you please give your thought on that?

    Should the output current be 0.9A as soon as I provide the input to the battery charger?
     
  10. RG23

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Dec 6, 2010
    301
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    Should the output current of the battery charger be measured between the same two output terminals as for measuring the output voltage?

    If thats the case I am not getting 0.9A between the output terminals but I get 14.7V between those two terminals.

    If anyone has an idea, please let me know

    Thanks
     
  11. retched

    AAC Fanatic!

    Dec 5, 2009
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    Current in measured in series, not between the terminals.
     
  12. Kermit2

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 5, 2010
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    How long was the battery left connected to the charger before it 'melted'? Overcharging can do this. Charging a battery with a shorted cell can also cause this to happen, and in that case, even using a proper duration of charging will not prevent it.
     
  13. marshallf3

    Well-Known Member

    Jul 26, 2010
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    It's possible the battery may have had an intermittent bad cell as your charger voltage readings sound right. The reason it isn't drawing the full 0.9A would be due to a defective battery or one that was already almost fully charged.
     
  14. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
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    It is normal for batteries to not use all the current available. Just because the label on the charger says it will provide .9 amps does not mean every battery will be willing to accept that.

    as for the melted battery, I think the battery was bad before you connected it for a charge. Your measurements on the charger indicate that it is still working correctly. That means the melted battery was sick.
     
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