Laplace

Discussion in 'Math' started by full, Nov 1, 2014.

  1. full

    Thread Starter Member

    May 3, 2014
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    I do this problem on Laplace but I can't complete this problem

    please help my

    number 2 -( E & F)


    and I very sorry for poor my paper

    thanks
     
  2. studiot

    AAC Fanatic!

    Nov 9, 2007
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  3. Papabravo

    Expert

    Feb 24, 2006
    10,170
    1,797
    It says use a table of Laplace transforms to complete the problem. Here is one that is the top google hit. What could be simpler!!?

    http://tutorial.math.lamar.edu/pdf/Laplace_Table.pdf

    Pick #19 for (e) and #9 for (f)

    Or did you want to verify the table entries by writing the definition and doing the integral? If so you might want to start by writing down the integral expression that is the definition of the Laplace Transform.

    P.S. -- don't pay any attention to the chicken scratchings on the textbook page, they are probably misleading.
     
  4. full

    Thread Starter Member

    May 3, 2014
    225
    2
  5. full

    Thread Starter Member

    May 3, 2014
    225
    2
    thanks sir
     
  6. full

    Thread Starter Member

    May 3, 2014
    225
    2
  7. full

    Thread Starter Member

    May 3, 2014
    225
    2
    hello

    I do this problem on Laplace in node.
    my problem in inverse Laplace please see my solution.
    and this is solution from book.
    there is any method I knew my solution true?
    please help my

    thanks
     
  8. full

    Thread Starter Member

    May 3, 2014
    225
    2
    update same post #7:
     
  9. full

    Thread Starter Member

    May 3, 2014
    225
    2
    update same post #7:
    I very sorry
     
  10. Papabravo

    Expert

    Feb 24, 2006
    10,170
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    I see two problems with your solutions. The first problem is doing the algebra required to get the transfer function into a standard form. The second problem is that you absolutely refuse to learn how to do a partial fraction expansion. Since both parts appear to be wrong I suggest that you start by reviewing the basic algebra required to get the transfer function. Once we agree on that we can go back to doing the partial fraction expansion.
    Here are some clues:
    The transfer function has a real zero at s=-2
    The transfer function has a real pole at the origin
    The transfer function has a pair of complex conjugate poles at 4/3 ± j√8/3
     
  11. WBahn

    Moderator

    Mar 31, 2012
    17,777
    4,805
    I see a two other problems. You still refuse to track your units and you still refuse to ask if your answer makes sense. Look at your circuit. What does the initial voltage across the resistor have to be? What does the final voltage across the resistor have to be? Does your solution satisfy those two requirements.
     
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