Laminator(s) for toner transfer method - board thickness

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by davidc, Sep 29, 2011.

  1. davidc

    Thread Starter Member

    Jul 2, 2009
    16
    0
    Searching for a reasonably-priced laminator to use for transferring toner to boards, I have found a number which mention a "maximum pouch thickness of 80 microns". Does this rule out using these for copper boards?

    For what it's worth, the boards I'm using are about 1.75mm in thickness. The paper I'm using is glossy photo paper, 205 g/m^2.

    E.g., one of the laminators I have in mind is this one.

    Does the pouch thickness even matter in this case?
     
    Last edited: Oct 2, 2011
  2. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
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    Your mileage may vary, I've seen several makes an models used. Mine will have a short life I suspect, PCBs do not flow through it very well. Another member mentioned a unit that worked well for him from Harbor Freight. There is an element of luck in this.

    I use wax paper. It make a very good toner transfer medium, and my laser printer does not handle photo paper very well.

    How I make PCBs
     
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  3. davidc

    Thread Starter Member

    Jul 2, 2009
    16
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    Thanks Bill. My primary concern is that this laminator only takes 80 micron pouches - while some take 250 micron pouches.

    Trying to iron the paper on is frustrating and non-repeatable - hence the interest.

    Will try to look into wax paper at some stage.
     
  4. HarveyH42

    Active Member

    Jul 22, 2007
    425
    5
    The thickness of the pouch, is more about the temperature of the laminater, thicker needs more heat. I use some thin board, cuts easy in a paper cutter, or with scissors. Don't really us large, heavy parts, so thick board isn't important. Got a little GL-4, 4" hot laminator for $20 surplus, years ago, hasn't had any problems.

    I use the Pulsar paper, quick, simple, reliable. I just want to get the board done, it's a chore, rather be soldering. Drilling holes ain't fun either, but don't think tiny surface mount would be any better.
     
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  5. davidc

    Thread Starter Member

    Jul 2, 2009
    16
    0
    That's what I suspected actually. I've never used a laminator before so was only guessing as to the relevance of the parameter. Even if it can't distribute as much heat as a more heavy-duty laminator, I guess I might have to pass the board through more than once or a twice to heat it sufficiently - which is hardly a huge burden.

    I'll go ahead and try this laminator anyway - and will report back if I have time.

    Thanks.
     
  6. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
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    As I said in the tutorial, you just have to experiment. The transfer technique seems to be one of the hard spots. Another friend here has done it with a rolling pin and heat if I understood him correctly. I hear a lot of recommendations for irons (as in ironing boards), but I've never gotten it to work well.
     
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