Kitchen Range Hood

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by dmshropshire, Dec 21, 2013.

  1. dmshropshire

    Thread Starter Member

    Dec 1, 2013
    33
    6
    So we had our overhead microwave burn up, and after failed attempts searching for schematics, and figuring out they do not make parts for this microwave any longer... I decided to salvage it. (Some of the inverter board parts were not legible after the damage, and I hear its not wise to alter this thing in any way.)

    So we had a copper hood made in its place. Seeing as how that set us back enough as it is, I am salvaging my microwave parts for the exhaust system.
    Its going to a pretty simple set up. 2 switches one for lamps and one for exhaust. I also want these switches variable or dimmers. Now my questions.

    Will a typical dimmer switch work properly with this type of motor? (See photo)

    I was also planning on using the AC filter that came out of the microwave. Is this necessary for just lights and exhaust fan? (See photo) I want to protect it as much as possible, basically once it goes up I would really hate to take it back down.

    I also have some "flame" detectors in a couple different temps. Would these be worth putting in the circuit? Since its pulling air out, it would not necessarily mean its feeding the fire?

    Any further tips or tricks would be helpful.
    Thanks!



    This is the switch I was thinking about - http://www.lowes.com/pd_69955-539-S...pl=1&currentURL=?Ntt=dimmer+switch&facetInfo=
     
  2. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
    10,556
    2,375
    Not if its a common split phase induction motor, which it appears to be.
    You don't really need the filter for non-electronic circuits.
    Max.
     
  3. dmshropshire

    Thread Starter Member

    Dec 1, 2013
    33
    6
    What would I need to make different speeds possible on this motor? Im sure there will be times I want this thing on, but not be blasting maximum noise. :)
     
  4. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
    10,556
    2,375
    Normally the type of motor on a range hood is shaded pole motor, similar technology but they will operate with the dimmer type circuitry.
    Speed control of a M.W. motor is not generally required, hence the different motor.
    Max.
     
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  5. dmshropshire

    Thread Starter Member

    Dec 1, 2013
    33
    6
    Ahh perfect. It seems I have a couple of these laying around too. If they draw as good as the one above, shaded may be my option.
    Thanks Max
     
  6. sheldons

    Active Member

    Oct 26, 2011
    616
    101
    give me a clue as to what the failure with the microwave was
     
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  7. inwo

    Well-Known Member

    Nov 7, 2013
    2,433
    315
    Yes, generally small problems, with generic parts.

    Often just slamming the door causes a dead short thru the fail-safe door switches.
     
  8. sheldons

    Active Member

    Oct 26, 2011
    616
    101
    then it was just an easy fault to repair due to a faulty monitor interlock or realighnment of the complete door interlock assembly
     
  9. dmshropshire

    Thread Starter Member

    Dec 1, 2013
    33
    6
    I was not around when it happened but from what I am told, they tried to replace the bulbs that were burnt out underneath the microwave. Apparently it was the wrong kind, and it started melting the plastic and some of the things around the bulb. Heard sizzle, breaker tripped, fuse blown, and the inverter board burnt up. Several components not legible, resistors and varistors mostly. Could not find schematics. Here is the board tho

    http://www.justanswer.com/appliance/530qb-kenmore-elite-ultra-wave-technology-microwave-oven.html

    Also they dont make the part anymore, or hardly any parts for that microwave.
     
  10. inwo

    Well-Known Member

    Nov 7, 2013
    2,433
    315
    Guess not.:(

    Op made the right decision.
     
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  11. sheldons

    Active Member

    Oct 26, 2011
    616
    101
    looking at that they have-generally microwave faults are fairly easy to repair but on one where an invertor pcb is used failure of that board usually means scrap microwave and buy another
     
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  12. dmshropshire

    Thread Starter Member

    Dec 1, 2013
    33
    6
    Well this makes me feel better. It was a fairly expensive microwave in its time so it wasn't a easy decision. But you get some good parts from them, so its not all bad. :cool:
     
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