kicad - Need new component CD4019B

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by Rissy, Jan 30, 2016.

  1. Rissy

    Thread Starter Member

    Nov 23, 2015
    84
    2
    Hi there,

    I'm a fairly new user of KICAD (PCB creation software) and i'm now at a position where I need a component which doesn't seem to exist in the default library. I'm therefore in need to make the component I need and add this to the library for use in creating a PCB using this component as part of the circuit. Does anyone have this component for kicad already, or can someone help me make it, as i'm having a bit of difficulty in doing this myself as it's quite a complex process it seems. The chip i want to create is a Texas Instruments CD4019B (CMOS QUAD AND/OR SELECT GATE in a 16 pin plastic DIL package).

    http://pdf1.alldatasheet.com/datasheet-pdf/view/157058/TI/CD4019B.html

    Thanks in advance for any help anyone can provide me. :)
     
  2. David Knight

    New Member

    Aug 4, 2015
    26
    5
    making components in layout software is an important fundamental skill.

    i think you'd do yourself a disservice by having someone else make the part.

    there are lots of tutorials on youtube that explain how to make kicad parts.
     
    absf likes this.
  3. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
    10,537
    2,369
    Usually the easiest way is to take an existing part which is very close, edit it and save in the same library as a new part No.
    Max.
     
  4. panic mode

    Senior Member

    Oct 10, 2011
    1,320
    304
    meh... i just make everything myself. takes a minute or two to generate both schematic component and footprint. maybe five if making 3D model as well.
    i agree with previous posts - no library will contain everything you want to use. new parts are made every day. learn how to design own libs
     
  5. Rissy

    Thread Starter Member

    Nov 23, 2015
    84
    2

    Can you offer me any assistance with the process. Like a step by step guide for this particular part? I'm usually quite into spending the time to do everything myself, but i'm getting some real grief from "her indoors" due to the time i've already spent learning kicad (to the degree i need to at least) and with this added hurdle, spending even more time watching multiple youtube videos etc trying to piece together the appropriate process for my own purposes seems like an impossible task right now. sigh.
     
  6. ErnieM

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 24, 2011
    7,387
    1,605
    Here's a step by step:

    1. Open Kicad and on the menu press HELP | Contents.

    2. Go to section 11.4 "Create a library component" and read the contents.

    3. A single part (Number of parts per package = 1) is easiest, stay with that for now.

    4. The most important part is to get all 16 pins down. I use the "passive" type as I don't use the rule check for pin connections.

    5. use the graphic box to draw the outline.

    6. Save this in either a standard library or your own. Just make sure you know which lib it is in so you can insure that lib is selected in Eescema
     
  7. Rissy

    Thread Starter Member

    Nov 23, 2015
    84
    2
    ...There is no section 11.4. I'm using KiCAD version 4.0.1 on a 64 bit laptop.

    The help sections only seem to go up to 4.2!?
     
  8. electrophile

    Member

    Aug 30, 2013
    100
    1
    Here is how I create custom parts:

    For the schematic:
    1. Go to Eeschema > Library Editor (the book with a pencil icon on the bar below the main menu).
    2. Choose the active library ("Select Active Library" is the second button from the left on the bar below the menu)
    3. Now click on "Create a new component" (5th button from the left)
    4. Create the schematic representation for your part
    5. Save it (Ctrl+S or Cmd+S in mac)
    Unlike Eagle, Kicad does not mandate compulsory association of schematic symbols with footprints at the time of component creation (though you can do this). For creating the custom footprint:
    1. Open Pcbnew
    2. Click on "footprint editor" (3rd button from the left on the bar below the menu)
    3. This opens a new window and the process is similar to creating a new schematic symbol
    4. Select the active library
    5. Either load an existing part from this library that you can modify and save as a different part (this is important or you'll end up over writing the existing one) or a create a new one. This is fairly straightforward, even for beginners.
    6. Save the part.
    7. Best to restart Kicad now. Go to Eeschema and run CvPCB to associate your new schematic symbol with the newly minted footprint
    Always Plot the layer mask (F.CU or B.Cu) to PDF and then print it (with "Original" selected under Scale) and compare with the real part. Best to do this before you make your boards. Also its a good idea to create custom libraries and custom footprint (.pretty) folder with all your custom footprints in it. A google search or the Kicad yahoo groups is a great place to start to know how to do this.
     
  9. Rissy

    Thread Starter Member

    Nov 23, 2015
    84
    2
    I've managed to create the symbol for the schematic editor (i think)

    But i'm having real problems trying to produce the associated (linked?) footprint.

    Attached is the files i've got so far. i'm struggling here. Doing the footprint doesn't seem to work in the same way as the schematic symbol creator.

    I need to stop now. i'm getting grief again. any help is appreciated.
     
  10. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
    10,537
    2,369
    Isn't this a standard 16 pin DIP (footprint)?
    Max.
     
  11. Rissy

    Thread Starter Member

    Nov 23, 2015
    84
    2
  12. electrophile

    Member

    Aug 30, 2013
    100
    1
    Like Max said, this is a standard 16-pin DIP package that already exists as one of the standard footprints in Kicad. Look under "Housings_DIP".
     
  13. Rissy

    Thread Starter Member

    Nov 23, 2015
    84
    2
    Thank you! I've placed a 16 pin chip on the board now. See screen shot. But now, how do i rename this and save it somewhere and link it to the schematic symbol i (hopefully) created properly last night (see attachment on previous email)
     
  14. Rissy

    Thread Starter Member

    Nov 23, 2015
    84
    2
    It's ok.. I'm sorted. As it turns out, there is already a 4019 (in several guises it seems) within the IEEE library. But i think i'll use my own symbol based schematic symbol instead. I understand now that i can use the generic 16 pin package to represent my 4019 in the pcb editor and not have to create my own or link it in any way, other than by the usual NET list method, so hopefully i'm on my way again.
     
    absf likes this.
  15. ErnieM

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 24, 2011
    7,387
    1,605
    The CvPcb module (between EEschema and PCBnew in the main Kicad project window) is the tool that links schematic symbols to PCB modules (the footprint you solder to).

    You can link any symbol to any module, but there has to be a 1 to 1 correspondence on the pins. You can also reuse modules as need be.
     
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